Faculty Session Overview

Faculty for Seminar XXI include renowned social scientists from MIT and subject matter experts from other top universities and research institutes in the United States and around the globe. Past faculty members have included Michèle Flournoy, Condoleezza Rice, Bernard Lewis, Sumit Ganguly, Samuel Huntington, Sarah Chayes, John Mearsheimer, Joseph Nye, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Gerard Prunier, and James Dobbins .

Name

Rawi Abdelal
Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management, Harvard Business School, Director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies

Rawi Abdelal is the Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management at Harvard Business School and is the Director of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His primary expertise is international political economy, and his research focuses on the politics of globalization and the political economy of Eurasia. Professor Abdelal is a faculty associate of Harvard's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, and he serves on the executive committee of the Davis Center. Professor Abdelal's first book, National Purpose in the World Economy, won the 2002 Shulman Prize as the outstanding book on the international relations of eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Abdelal's second book, Capital Rules, explains the evolution of the social norms and legal rules of the international financial system. Abdelal has also edited or co-edited three books: The Rules of Globalization, a collection of Harvard Business School cases on international business; Measuring Identity; and Constructing the International Economy. Abdelal is currently at work on The Profits of Power, a book that explores the geopolitics of energy in Europe and Eurasia.

Scott Appleby
Marilyn Keough Dean, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame

Scott Appleby is the Marilyn Keough Dean of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs. From 2000-2014, he served as the Regan Director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Appleby co-directs, with Ebrahim Moosa and Atalia Omer, Contending Modernities, a major multi-year project to examine the interaction among Catholic, Muslim, and secular forces in the modern world. Appleby’s research examines the various ways in which religious movements and organizations shape, and are shaped by national, regional and global dynamics of governance, deadly conflict, international relations and economic development. He co-chaired the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ Task Force on Religion and the Making of U.S. Foreign Policy, which released the influential report, “Engaging Religious Communities Abroad: A New Imperative for U.S. Foreign Policy.” Appleby is the author or editor of 15 books, including the widely cited volumes of The Fundamentalism Project; The Ambivalence of the Sacred: Religion, Violence and Reconciliation; Catholics in the American Century; Peacebuilding: Catholic Theology, Ethics and Praxis; and Church and Age Unite! The Modernist Impulse in American Catholicism.

Robert Art
Director, Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University, Senior Fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT’s Center for International Studies

Robert Art, the Director of MIT's Seminar XXI Program, is Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University and a Senior Fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT's Center for International Studies. He has served as a Consultant to the Secretary of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency, and is currently a Faculty Associate of the National Intelligence Council. Professor Art's books include The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military; Reorganizing America's Defense, with Samuel P. Huntington and Vincent Davis, eds.; U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role with Seyom Brown, eds.; The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, with Patrick Cronin, eds.; Democracy and Counterterrorism, with Louise Richardson, eds.; A Grand Strategy for America; and America’s Grand Strategy and World Politics.

Deborah Avant
Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, Director of the Sié Center, University of Denver

Deborah Avant is the Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy and Director of the Sié Center at the University of Denver. Avant is also the inaugural Editor-in-Chief of the ISA’s newly launched Journal of Global Security Studies. Her research (funded by grants from the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the Carnegie Corporation, among others) focuses on civil-military relations, the roles of non-state actors in security, the politics of controlling violence, and global governance. Under her leadership the Sié Chéou-Kang Center launched the Private Security Monitor, an annotated guide to regulation, data and analyses of global private military and security services, in 2012. In 2013 she was awarded an honorary doctorate from University of St. Gallen for her research and contribution toward regulating private military and security companies. Prior to joining the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, she held positions at the University of California, Irvine and George Washington University. Her most recent books are The New Power Politics: Networks and Transnational Security Governance; Pragmatic Networks and Transnational Governance of Private Military and Security Services; and Who Governs the Globe?

Eva Bellin
Myra and Robert Kraft Professor of Arab Politics, Brandeis University

Eva Bellin is the Myra and Robert Kraft Professor of Arab Politics in the Department of Politics and the Crown Center for Middle East Studies at Brandeis University. Bellin is a comparativist whose interests center on issues of democratization and authoritarian persistence, political and economic reform, civil society, religion and politics, and the politics of cultural change. She is the author of Stalled Democracy: Capital, Labor, and the Paradox of State Sponsored Development and co-editor of Building Rule of Law in the Arab World. She has published in a variety of venues including World Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Science Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, World Development, Foreign Affairs, Middle East Policy, as well as numerous edited books. In 2006-2008 she was named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, supporting her research on high courts in the Middle East and Islamic World. She was also named a Fellow at the Princeton Institute for Regional and International Studies, Democracy and Development Program in 2006-2007. Bellin has served on the editorial board of the journal Comparative Politics since 2005. She has conducted field work in Tunisia, Egypt, Israel, and Pakistan.

Joel Brenner
Senior Research Fellow, Center for International Studies, MIT

Joel Brenner specializes in cyber and physical security, data protection and privacy, intelligence law, the administration of classified information and facilities, and the regulation of sensitive cross-border transactions. He has represented companies and individuals in a wide variety of transactions and proceedings including sensitive foreign acquisitions involving the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S., the law governing network operations, the liability of foreign governments, export controls, and internal corporate and government investigations. Brenner was Senior Counsel at the National Security Agency, advising Agency leadership on the public-private effort to create better security for the Internet. From 2006 until mid-2009, he was the head of U.S. counterintelligence under the Director of National Intelligence and was responsible for integrating the counterintelligence activities of the 17 departments and agencies with intelligence authorities, including the FBI and CIA and elements of the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Homeland Security. From 2002 – 2006, Joel was NSA’s Inspector General, responsible for that agency’s top-secret internal audits and investigations. In addition to his practice, Joel is a Senior Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he divides his time between the Center for International Studies and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab. Mr. Brenner is the author of America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime and Warfare and Glass Houses: Privacy, Secrecy, and Cyber Insecurity in a Transparent World.

Matthew Carnes
Associate Professor, Department of Government, Georgetown University

Fr. Matthew Carnes, S.J., is an associate professor at Georgetown University in the Department of Government and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and he currently serves as the Director of the Center for Latin American Studies. His research examines the dynamics of labor and social welfare policy, with particular interest in the ways societies protect their most vulnerable members: the old, the young, the ill or injured, and the unemployed. His principal regional focus is Latin America, and in recent years he has conducted extensive field research in Argentina, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia. In 2011, he was awarded the Dorothy Brown Award for Outstanding Teaching Achievement, Georgetown University’s highest teaching award, presented by the student body to the faculty member who has had the strongest impact on the students' university experience. In addition, in 2011, at the Tropaia Ceremony for Georgetown College, he was awarded the Edward B. Bunn, S.J. Award for Faculty Excellence, given by the graduating seniors in the College of Arts and Sciences. In 2012, he was featured as one of the country's best professors in the Princeton Review's publication, 300 Best Professors. And in 2013, he was chosen by students as the Faculty Member of the Year in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. In recent years, he has been a Visiting Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame (Spring 2009) and a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University (Academic Year 2011-2012). He is the author of Continuity Despite Change: The Politics of Labor Market Regulation in Latin America.

Victor Cha
Director of Asian Studies, Georgetown University, Senior Adviser, CSIS

Victor Cha joined CSIS in May 2009 as a senior adviser and the inaugural holder of the Korea Chair. He is also director of Asian studies and holds the D.S. Song-KF Chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. From 2004 to 2007, he served as director for Asian affairs at the White House on the National Security Council (NSC), where he was responsible primarily for Japan, the Korean peninsula, Australia/New Zealand, and Pacific Island nation affairs. Dr. Cha was also the deputy head of delegation for the United States at the Six-Party Talks in Beijing and received two Outstanding Service Commendations during his tenure at the NSC. He is the award-winning author of Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle, winner of the 2000 Ohira Book Prize; Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies, with Dave Kang; Beyond the Final Score: The Politics of Sport in Asia; and The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future, selected by Foreign Affairs magazine as a 2012 “Best Book on Asia and the Pacific.” His newest book is Powerplay: Origins of the American Alliance System in Asia. Dr. Cha is a former John M. Olin National Security Fellow at Harvard University, a two-time Fulbright Scholar, and a Hoover National Fellow, CISAC Fellow, and William J. Perry Fellow at Stanford University. He holds Georgetown University’s Dean’s Teaching Award for 2010 and the Distinguished Research Award for 2011.

Sarah Chayes
Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment

Sarah Chayes, a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law program, is the author of Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security. She is internationally recognized for her innovative thinking on corruption and its implications. Her work explores how severe corruption can help prompt such crises as terrorism, revolutions and their violent aftermaths, and environmental degradation. Before joining Carnegie, Chayes served as special assistant to the top U.S. military officer, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen. She focused on governance issues, participating in cabinet-level decision-making on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Arab Spring, and traveling with Mullen frequently to these regions. Chayes was tapped for the job after her work as special adviser to two commanders of the international troops in Afghanistan (ISAF), at the end of a decade on the ground there. It was a sense of historic opportunity that prompted Chayes to end her journalism career in early 2002, after covering the fall of the Taliban for NPR, and to remain in Afghanistan to help rebuild the country. She chose to settle in the former Taliban heartland, Kandahar. In 2005, Chayes founded Arghand, a start-up manufacturing cooperative, where men and women working together produce fine skin-care products. The goal was to revive the region’s historic role in exporting fruit and its derivatives, to promote sustainable development, and expand alternatives to the opium economy. From 1996 to 2001, Chayes was NPR’s Paris correspondent. For her work during the Kosovo crisis, she shared the 1999 Foreign Press Club and Sigma Delta Chi awards. Along with Thieves of State, which won the 2016 Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Chayes is the author of The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban.

Benjamin Cohen
Louis G. Lancaster Professor of International Political Economy, University of California

Benjamin J. Cohen is Louis G. Lancaster Professor of International Political Economy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has been a member of the Political Science Department since 1991. He previously taught at Princeton University from 1964-1971 and at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University from 1971-1991. His publications have addressed issues of international monetary relations, U.S. foreign economic policy, European monetary integration, developing country debt, and theories of economic imperialism. His most recent publications include The Future of Global Currency: The Euro versus the Dollar; "Toward a New Consensus: From Denial to Acceptance," in Nicola Phillips and Catherine Weaver, eds., International Political Economy: Debating the Past, Present and Future; and "Are IPE Journals Becoming Boring?" in International Studies Quarterly 54:3. He has won numerous awards and in 2000 was named Distinguished Scholar of the year by the International Political Economy Section of the International Studies Association.

Alex de Waal
Executive Director, World Peace Foundation, Research Professor, Tufts University

Alex de Waal is Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation and a Research Professor at The Fletcher School at Tufts University. Considered one of the foremost experts on Sudan and the Horn of Africa, his scholarship and practice has also probed humanitarian crisis and response, human rights, HIV/AIDS and governance in Africa, and conflict and peacebuilding. Professor de Waal received a D.Phil. from Oxford for his thesis on the 1984-1985 Darfur famine in Sudan. He worked for several Africa-focused human rights organizations, focusing on the Horn of Africa, and especially on avenues to peaceful resolution of the second Sudanese Civil War. He also researched the intersection of HIV/AIDS, poverty and governance, and initiated the Commission on HIV/AIDS and Governance in Africa. De Waal was a fellow at the Global Equity Initiative at Harvard (2004-2006), and Program Director at the Social Science Research Council. He was a member of the African Union mediation team for Darfur (2005-2006) and senior adviser to the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel for Sudan (2009-2012). He was on the list of Foreign Policy’s 100 most influential public intellectuals in 2008 and Atlantic Monthly’s 27 “brave thinkers” in 2009. His most recent publications include The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa: Money, War and the Business of Power; Advocacy in Conflict: Critical Perspectives on Transnational Activism; and AIDS and Power: Why There is No Political Crisis–Yet.

Alexander Downes
Associate Professor of Political Science, George Washington University

Alexander B. Downes is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University. Downes’s book Targeting Civilians in War won the Helen Dwight Reid Award for best dissertation in international relations, law, and politics in 2006 from the American Political Science Association. Downes has published on a variety of subjects in international security, including civilian victimization, foreign-imposed regime change, military effectiveness, democracy, coercion, and solutions to civil wars. His work can be found in the British Journal of Political Science, Civil Wars, International Organization, International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, SAIS Review, and Security Studies, as well as multiple edited volumes. Downes was recently named the winner of the inaugural Emerging Scholar Award, given by the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association to recognize scholars under the age of 45, or within fifteen years of receiving the Ph.D., who are judged to have made (through the body of their publications) the most significant contribution to the field of security studies. Downes has held fellowships at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (2007/08) and Olin Institute for Strategic Studies (2002/03), and the Center for International Security and Cooperation (2003/04) at Stanford University. His work has been funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Eisenhower Institute, Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, Smith Richardson Foundation, and Office of Naval Research. Before joining the GW faculty, Downes was Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 2004-2011.

R. David Edelman
Director, MIT Project on Technology, the Economy, & National Security

R. David Edelman is Director of the Project on Technology, the Economy, & National Security (TENS), part of the MIT Internet Policy Research Initiative (IPRI). He holds joint appointments in the Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and the Center for International Studies (CIS). Until January 2017, Edelman served at the White House as Special Assistant to the President for Economic and Technology Policy at the National Economic Council (NEC) and Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP). In that role he led the White House team focusing on the digital economy — including broadband, telecommunications, spectrum, and technology trade — as well as consumer cybersecurity, domestic and international data privacy, high-tech patent and copyright issues, and antitrust/competition. From 2010 – 2012 Edelman served as the first Director for International Cyber Policy on the National Security Council (NSC). In his six years at the White House he led the development of and co-authored over a dozen legislative proposals, national strategies, Executive Orders, and Presidential reports — including the High Tech Patent Task Force; the Big Data Report to the President; EU-U.S. data privacy frameworks; and various consumer privacy bills. Previously Edelman served at the State Department’s Office of Cyber Affairs, where he developed the U.S. government's early diplomatic strategy and legal doctrine on cyber issues, and later served as the United States' lead negotiator on Internet issues at the United Nations. He was awarded the State Department's Superior Honor Award for his work on intelligence matters, and was twice the recipient of the Meritorious Honor Award for his United Nations negotiations and development of the nation's cyber diplomacy strategy.

Kimberly Elliott
Visiting Fellow, Center for Global Development

Kimberly Ann Elliott is a Visiting Fellow with the Center for Global Development and the author or co-author of numerous books and articles on trade policy and globalization, economic sanctions, and food security. In 2009-10 she chaired the CGD working group that produced the report, Open Markets for the Poorest Countries: Trade Preferences that Work, and before that, authored the book Delivering on Doha: Farm Trade and the Poor. Elliott was with the Peterson Institute for many years before joining the Center full-time. Her books published there include Can International Labor Standards Improve under Globalization?; Corruption and the Global Economy; Reciprocity and Retaliation in US Trade Policy; Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States; and Economic Sanctions Reconsidered. She served on a National Research Council committee on Monitoring International Labor Standards and on the USDA Consultative Group on the Elimination of Child Labor in US Agricultural Imports, and is currently a member of the National Advisory Committee for Labor Provisions in US Free Trade Agreements.

Sumit Ganguly
Professor of Political Science, Indiana University, Bloomington

Sumit Ganguly is a Professor of Political Science, holds the Rabindranath Tagore Chair in Indian Cultures and Civilizations and directs the Center on American and Global Security at Indiana University, Bloomington. A specialist on the international and comparative politics of South Asia he has previously taught at James Madison College of Michigan State University, at Hunter College of the City University of New York, the School of Public and International Affairs at Columbia University and the University of Texas at Austin. In the spring quarter of 2014 he was the Visiting Buffet Professor of International Studies at Northwestern University. He has also been a Fellow and a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC; and a Visiting Fellow at the Center on International Security and Cooperation as well as the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford University. In 2010 he was a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Defense Studies and Analysis in New Delhi. Professor Ganguly is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of twenty books on the contemporary domestic and international politics of South Asia. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Asian Security, Current History, The India Review, International Security, Journal of Democracy, The Nonproliferation Review and Pacific Affairs. Professor Ganguly is also an Associate Editor of Security Studies. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (New York) and a Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia. His recent publications include How Rivalries End; Deadly Impasse: India and Pakistan at the Dawn of a New Century; and Ascending India and Its State Capacity to be published in 2017.

Gregory Gause
Professor of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University

F. Gregory Gause, III is the John H. Lindsey ’44 Chair, professor of international affairs and head of the International Affairs Department at the Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on the politics of the Middle East, with a particular focus on the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian Gulf. He was previously on the faculties of the University of Vermont (1995-2014) and Columbia University (1987-1995), and was Fellow for Arab and Islamic Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York (1993-1994). During the 2009-10 academic year he was Kuwait Foundation Visiting Professor of International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. In spring 2009 he was a Fulbright Scholar at the American University in Kuwait. In spring 2010 he was a research fellow at the King Faisal Center for Islamic Studies and Research in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He has published three books, most recently The International Relations of the Persian Gulf. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Middle East Journal, Security Studies, Washington Quarterly, National Interest, and in other journals and edited volumes.

Caroline Hartzell
Professor of Political Science, Gettysburg College

Caroline Hartzell is a Professor in the Political Science Department at Gettysburg College and was the founding director of the College's Globalization Studies program. Her specialization is in international political economy with an emphasis on issues of conflict and conflict management, development, and globalization. Professor Hartzell's research focuses on cross-national civil war settlements and the effects institutions, both domestic and international, have on social conflict. She has published numerous journal articles on the effects that power-sharing settlements of civil wars have on the duration and quality of the peace, as well as co-authored and co-edited books on those topics.  Professor Hartzell's research has been supported by the U.S. Institute of Peace, where she was a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, and a grant from the National Science Foundation to carry out survey research on factors affecting the stability of the peace following power-sharing settlements. Professor Hartzell is editor of the journal Conflict Management and Peace Science, the journal of the Peace Science Society (International).  She also serves on the editorial boards of the journals Ethnopolitics and Foreign Policy Analysis.

Ron Hassner
Associate Professor & Co-Director, Religion, Politics and Globalization Program, University of California, Berkeley

Ron E. Hassner is associate professor of international relations and co-director of University of California, Berkeley's Religion, Politics and Globalization Program. He founded and now chairs the “Religion and International Relations” section of the International Studies Association, and is an associate editor of the journal Security Studies. He studies the role of symbols and ideas in international security with particular attention to the relationship between religion and conflict. His publications have focused on territorial disputes, religion in the military, conflicts over holy places, and the pervasive role of religion on the modern battlefield. His recent publications include Religion in the Military Worldwide; Religion on the Battlefield; and War on Sacred Grounds.

 

Kathleen Hicks
Director of the International Security Program, CSIS

Kathleen Hicks is senior vice president, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and director of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS). She is a frequent writer and lecturer on U.S. foreign policy; national security strategy, forces, and budget; and strategic futures. Dr. Hicks previously served in the Department of Defense as principal deputy under secretary for policy, a Senate-confirmed position with responsibility for assisting in the development and oversight of global and regional defense policy, strategy, and operations. She also served as deputy under secretary of defense for strategy, plans, and forces, leading the development of the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review and crafting guidance for future force capabilities, overseas military posture, and contingency and theater campaign plans. Dr. Hicks was a senior fellow at CSIS from 2006 to 2009, leading a variety of national security research projects. From 1993 to 2006, she was a career civil servant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from Presidential Management Intern to the Senior Executive Service. Dr. Hicks received numerous recognitions for her service in the Department of Defense (DOD), including distinguished awards from three secretaries of defense and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She also received the 2011 DOD Senior Professional Women’s Association Excellence in Leadership Award. Dr. Hicks was a presidentially appointed commissioner for the National Commission on the Future of the Army. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Boards of Advisors for the Truman National Security Project and SoldierStrong.

Bruce Hoffman
Professor of International Relations, Georgetown University

Bruce Hoffman is currently Director of the Center for Security Studies, Director of the Security Studies Program, and a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Washington, DC. Professor Hoffman previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was also Director of RAND’s Washington, D.C. Office. From 2001 to 2004, he served as RAND’s Vice President for External Affairs and in 2004 he also was Acting Director of RAND’s Center for Middle East Public Policy. He was recently appointed by the U.S. Congress to serve as a commissioner on the Independent Commission to Review the FBI’s Post-9/11 Response to Terrorism and Radicalization. Professor Hoffman is a Global Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C.; a Senior Fellow at the Combating Terrorism Center, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY; a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel; and, a Visiting Professor at the Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. He is also a contributing editor to The National Interest and Editor-in-Chief of Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, the leading scholarly journal in the field. His recent publications include Inside Terrorism; The Evolving Global Terrorist Threat: Cases From 9/11 to Osama bin Laden’s Death; and Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947.

Jolyon Howorth
Jean Monnet Professor of European Politics, University of Bath, Visiting Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Jolyon Howorth is Jean Monnet Professor of European Politics ad personam and Emeritus Professor of European Studies at the University of Bath (UK). He has been a Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at Yale since 2002, dividing his teaching between the Political Science Department, the Jackson Institute and EP&E. Previous appointments were at: University of Paris III-Sorbonne-Nouvelle, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Aston University. He has held Visiting Professorships at Harvard University, the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris), Luiss-Guido Carli University (Rome), the University of Washington, Columbia and New York Universities, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University of New South Wales (Australia).  He has held a Senior Research Fellowship at the European Union’s Institute for Security Studies and has been a Senior Research Associate at the Institut Français des Relations Internationales (Paris), a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts (UK), Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques (France), and Member of the Advisory Boards of the European Institute for Public Administration (Netherlands), the Centre for the Study of Security and Diplomacy (UK), the Institute for Strategic Research (IRSEM, Paris) and the European Policy Centre (Brussels). He has published extensively in the field of European politics and history, especially security and defense policy and transatlantic relations - fifteen books and two hundred and fifty journal articles and book chapters. Recent books include: Security and Defence Policy in the European Union; Defending Europe: the EU, NATO and the Quest for European Autonomy; and European Integration and Defence: the Ultimate Challenge?

Josef Joffe
Fellow, Hoover Institution, Publisher/Editor, Die Zeit

Josef Joffe, the Marc and Anita Abramowitz Fellow in International Relations at the Hoover Institution, is publisher-editor of the German weekly Die Zeit. Previously he was columnist/editorial page editor of Süddeutsche Zeitung (1985–2000). His areas of interest are: U.S. foreign policy, international security policy, European-American relations, Europe and Germany, and the Middle East. His second career has been in academia. Currently, he is adjunct professor of political science at Stanford, where he was the Payne Distinguished Lecturer in 1999–2000. He also is a distinguished fellow of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. In 1990–91, he taught at Harvard, where he is also an associate of the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. He was a visiting lecturer in 2002 at Dartmouth College and in 1998 at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. He was a professorial lecturer at Johns Hopkins (School of Advanced International Studies) in 1982–1984. He has taught at the University of Munich and the Salzburg Seminar. His scholarly work has appeared in many books and in journals such as Foreign Affairs, the National InterestInternational Security, and Foreign Policy as well as in professional journals in Germany, Britain, and France. He is the author of The Limited Partnership: Europe, the United States and the Burdens of Alliance and coauthor of Eroding Empire: Western Relations With Eastern Europe. His most recent book is The Future of International Politics: The Great Powers (1998); forthcoming is Über-Power: The Imperial Temptation in American Foreign Policy, to be published by W.W. Norton.

Stephen Kaplan
Assistant Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, Georgetown University

Stephen B. Kaplan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Professor Kaplan's research and teaching interests focus on the frontiers of international and comparative political economy, where he specializes in the political economy of global finance and development, the rise of China in the Western Hemisphere, and Latin American politics. Professor Kaplan joined the GWU faculty in the fall of 2010 after completing a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University and his Ph.D at Yale University. While at Yale, Kaplan also worked as a researcher for former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. Prior to his doctoral studies, Professor Kaplan was a senior economic analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, writing extensively on developing country economics, global financial market developments, and emerging market crises from 1998 to 2003. His recent publications include Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America; Neoliberalism in Retreat? The China Boom in Latin America; and "Banking Unconditionally: The Political Economy of Chinese Finance in Latin America" published in the Review of International Political Economy in September 2016.

Jonathan Kirshner
Professor of International Political Economy, Cornell University

Jonathan Kirshner is the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Professor of International Political Economy at Cornell University’s Department of Government. He served as director of Cornell’s Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies from 2007 to 2015, and previously chaired the Economics and National Security Program at the Olin Institute of Strategic Studies at Harvard. His research and teaching interests focus on international relations, political economy (especially macroeconomics and money), and politics and film. He is currently pursuing projects on classical realism, the international political implications of the financial crisis and its aftermath, and the politics of mid-century cinema. Recent books include American Power after the Financial Crisis, and Hollywood’s Last Golden Age: Politics, Society and the Seventies Film in America. His first book, Currency and Coercion: The Political Economy of International Monetary Power explored how states manipulate international monetary relations to advance security-related goals. Another book, Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War, illustrated how financial interests and international financial markets can shape and constrain states’ grand strategies and influence decisions about war and peace. Appeasing Bankers won the best book award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association.

Andrey Kortunov
Director General, Russian International Affairs Council

Dr. Andrey Kortunov is the Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council. Dr. Kortunov previously served as Deputy Director of the Institute for US and Canadian Studies. He was founder and first president of the Moscow Public Science Foundation. He has taught Russian foreign policy at the University Of Miami and at the Lewis & Clark College in Portland (University of California). In 2011, he was elected Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council non-profit partnership established by order of the President of the Russian Federation. His academic focus is international relations, foreign and domestic policy of Russia and Russian-American relations. Dr. Kortunov is the author of over 120 publications dedicated to the analysis of Soviet/Russian-American relations, global security, and the foreign and domestic policy of the USSR and Russia. His major recent publications include Russia and UN Reforms, and Disintegration of the Soviet Union and US Policies.

James Kunder
Affiliated Expert, The Lugar Center, Principal, Kunder/Reali Associates

James Kunder is principal at Kunder/Reali Associates, an Alexandria, Virginia-based consulting firm, specializing in international development, post-conflict reconstruction and civil-military relations.  Concurrently, he serves as an Affiliated Expert at The Lugar Center, in Washington, DC, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network. In 2014-15, working with Palladium, Kunder led a major evaluation project for the Department of State Bureau of Intelligence and Research, examining whether U.S. Government programs attempting to counter violent extremism abroad were achieving their objectives. Kunder has extensive government and private sector experience managing international development, relief and reconstruction programs.  At USAID, Kunder has served as Acting Deputy Administrator, Assistant Administrator for Asia and the Near East, Director for Relief and Reconstruction in Afghanistan, and Director of the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance. In the private sector, Kunder was Vice President for Program Development at Save the Children Federation. He has also served as a legislative director in the U.S. House of Representatives, and was a candidate for Congress in Pennsylvania’s Fourth Congressional District.  Prior to his service on Capitol Hill, he was on active military duty as an infantry platoon commander in the U.S. Marine Corps. He currently teaches at the U.S. Foreign Service Institute, at USAID, and at the Marine Corps University. He has authored numerous publications on international humanitarian issues, reconstruction, peacekeeping and crisis management.

Christopher Layne
Robert M. Gates Chair in Intelligence and National Security, Texas A&M University

Christopher Layne is University Distinguished Professor of International Affairs and Robert M. Gates Chair in National Security at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. His fields of interest are international relations theory, great power politics, US foreign policy, and grand strategy. Professor Layne has written two books: The Peace of Illusions: American Grand Strategy from 1940 to the Present and (with Bradley A. Thayer) American Empire: A Debate. His current book project, After the Fall: International Politics, U.S. Grand Strategy, and the End of the Pax Americana, is under contract with Yale University Press. Additionally, he has contributed extensively to the debates about international relations theory and American foreign policy in such scholarly and policy journals as International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International History Review, Security Studies, International Politics, Review of International Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, The National Interest, Foreign Policy, The Washington Quarterly, World Policy Journal, and Orbis. Professor Layne has been a frequent contributor to The Atlantic, The New Republic, The Nation, Financial Times, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, and The Australian. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is a member of the Editorial Board of Security Studies. In May/June 2014, he was a visiting fellow at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo.

Keir Lieber
Associate Professor of Political Science, Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service

Keir Lieber is Associate Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, where he is a core faculty member of the Center for Security Studies and of the Security Studies Program. He also holds a joint appointment with the Department of Government. Lieber was recently named by the Carnegie Corporation of New York as one of the country's most innovative scholars. As a member of the inaugural class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows, he received a major research grant to support his project, "Nuclear Weapons and the New Era of Strategic Instability." Lieber’s research and teaching interests include the causes of war; nuclear weapons, deterrence, and strategy; U.S. foreign policy; and international relations theory. He is author of War and the Engineers: The Primacy of Politics over Technology and editor of War, Peace, and International Political Realism. His articles have appeared in leading scholarly and foreign policy publications – most recently in International Security, Foreign Affairs, and the Atlantic Monthly. He is currently writing a book with Daryl Press (Dartmouth College) on nuclear weapons and international relations. Lieber has also been awarded fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Council on Foreign Relations, Earhart Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Mellon Foundation, and Smith Richardson Foundation.

Herb Lin
Senior Research Scholar, Stanford University

Dr. Herb Lin is senior research scholar for cyber policy and security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and Hank J. Holland Fellow in Cyber Policy and Security at the Hoover Institution, both at Stanford University.  His research interests relate broadly to policy-related dimensions of cybersecurity and cyberspace, and he is particularly interested in and knowledgeable about the use of offensive operations in cyberspace, especially as instruments of national policy.  In addition to his positions at Stanford University, he is Chief Scientist, Emeritus for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies, where he served from 1990 through 2014 as study director of major projects on public policy and information technology, and Adjunct Senior Research Scholar and Senior Fellow in Cybersecurity (not in residence) at the Saltzman Institute for War and Peace Studies in the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University; and a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. He recently served on President Obama’s Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity.  Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. His recent publications include Attribution of Malicious Cyber Incidents: From Soup to Nuts and Maneuvering The China-U.S. Relationship in Cyberspace.

Suzanne Maloney
Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution, Deputy Director, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Suzanne Maloney is deputy director of the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution and a senior fellow in the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy and Energy Security and Climate Initiative, where her research focuses on Iran and Persian Gulf energy. She is the editor of Markaz, a blog on politics in and policy toward the Middle East published by the Brookings Institution. Her books include the 2008 monograph Iran's Long Reach as well as Iran's Political Economy since the Revolution. Her Brookings Essay, Iran Surprises Itself And The World, was released in September 2013, and she has also published articles in a variety of academic and policy journals. Maloney previously served as an external advisor to senior State Department officials on long-term issues related to Iran. Before joining Brookings, she served on the secretary of state's policy planning staff, as Middle East advisor for ExxonMobil Corporation, and director of the 2004 Council on Foreign Relations Task Force on U.S. policy toward Iran, chaired by former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski and Defense Secretary Robert Gates. She also serves as an adjunct professor in the Middle East Studies program at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins.

John Mearsheimer
R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and the co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1982. Professor Mearsheimer has written extensively about security issues and international politics more generally. He has published five books: Conventional Deterrence (1983), which won the Edgar S. Furniss, Jr., Book Award; Liddell Hart and the Weight of History (1988); The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (2001), which won the Joseph Lepgold Book Prize; The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (with Stephen M. Walt, 2007), which made the New York Times best seller list and has been translated into nineteen different languages; and Why Leaders Lie: The Truth about Lying in International Politics (2011). He has also written many articles that have appeared in academic journals like International Security, and popular magazines like the London Review of Books. Furthermore he has written a number of op-ed pieces for the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times dealing with topics like Bosnia, nuclear proliferation, American policy towards India, the failure of Arab-Israeli peace efforts, and the folly of invading Iraq. In 2003, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Andrew Moravcsik
Professor of Politics, Princeton University, Director, European Union Program, Princeton University

Andrew Moravcsik is Professor of Politics and Director of the European Union Program at Princeton University. He has authored over 125 scholarly publications, including four books, on European integration, international relations theory, qualitative/historical methods, human rights, international law and organization, and other topics. His history of the European Union, The Choice for Europe, has been called "the most important work in the field" (American Historical Review). The National Science, Ford, Fulbright, Olin and Krupp Foundations, as well as various universities and institutes, have supported his research. In 2011, he won the Stanley Kelley Award for Undergraduate Teaching from Princeton University. He has served as trade negotiator for the US Government, special assistant to the Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea, press assistant for the European Commission, and on various policy commissions. He has published over 100 commentaries and policy analyses, currently serves as Book Review Editor (Europe) at Foreign Affairs, and was formerly Contributing Editor at Newsweek and Editor-in-Chief at a Washington foreign policy journal. Since 2004 he has been a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution, and has been at various times a long-term visitor at research institutes in France, Italy, Britain, the US and China.

Vipin Narang
Associate Professor of Political Science, MIT

Vipin Narang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT and a member of MIT’s Security Studies Program. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Government, Harvard University in May 2010, where he was awarded the Edward M. Chase Prize for the best dissertation in international relations. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering with distinction from Stanford University and an M. Phil with Distinction in international relations from Balliol College, Oxford University, where he studied on a Marshall Scholarship. He has been a fellow at Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, a predoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a Stanton junior faculty fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research interests include nuclear proliferation and strategy, South Asian security, and general security studies. His first book Nuclear Strategy in the Modern Era on the deterrence strategies of regional nuclear powers won the 2015 ISA International Security Studies Section Best Book Award. He is currently working on his second book, Strategies of Nuclear Proliferation, which explores how states pursue nuclear weapons.  His work has been published in several journals including International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, and International Organization.

Kenneth Oye
Director, Program on Emerging Technologies, MIT

Kenneth Oye is Professor of Political Science (School of Humanities Arts and Social Sciences) and Data Systems and Society (School of Engineering) and Director of the Program on Emerging Technologies (PoET) at MIT, with work on international relations, political economy and technology policy. His work in international relations includes Cooperation under Anarchy, Economic Discrimination and Political Exchange, and four “Eagle” monographs on American foreign policy, and advisory work for the Petersen Institute, UNIDO and US Treasury, Commerce and EXIM. His work in technology policy has focused on adaptive management of risks associated with synthetic biology, pharmaceuticals, the internet and nuclear energy, with papers in Nature, Science, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Politics and the Life Sciences and Issues in Science and Technology. Professor Oye is a faculty affiliate of the MIT Synthetic Biology Center, the Center for Biomedical Innovation, and the Internet Policy Research Initiative. He chairs biosafety committees for iGEM and the Broad Institute Biofoundry and has served as an invited expert to the UN BWC, WHO, PCAST and NRC. He is a recipient of the Levitan Award for Excellence in Teaching (2011), the Graduate Council Teaching Award (1998) and the Technology and Policy Program Faculty Appreciation Award (2003). Before coming to MIT, Professor Oye taught at Harvard University, the University of California, Princeton University and Swarthmore College.

Daryl Press
Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth College

Daryl Press is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College. Professor Press is the author of Calculating Credibility: How Leaders Assess Military Threats, a book on decision-making during crises. He has published scholarly articles in International Security, Security Studies, and China Security, as well as articles for a wider audience in Foreign Affairs, the Atlantic Monthly, and the New York Times. Professor Press has worked as a consultant for the RAND Corporation and the U.S. Department of Defense, and is a research affiliate at the Security Studies Program at MIT. He also serves as an Associate Editor at the journal International Security. Professor Press is currently writing a book (with Keir Lieber, Georgetown University) on nuclear deterrence - during the Cold War and the future - as well as a series of articles (with Eugene Gholz, UT Austin) on energy and security.

Gerard Prunier
Independent Consultant on Eastern and Central African Affairs, Former Director of the French Center for Ethiopian Studies, Addis-Ababa

Dr. Gerard Prunier is an Independent Consultant on Eastern and Central African affairs and former Director of the French Center for Ethiopian Studies in Addis-Ababa. One of the foremost Africanists in the world today, Prunier is the author of more than two hundred scholarly articles and a dozen books in four languages, including The Rwanda Crisis: History of a Genocide, Darfur: A 21st Century Genocide—which was hailed by Foreign Affairs as “the best available account of the Darfur crisis”—and Africa’s World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of Continental Catastrophe, which was awarded a special honorable mention in the Council on Foreign Relations’ 2010 Arthur Ross Book Award competition for the best book published in international relations, the first Africa-focused book ever so honored. Until he reached the mandatory retirement age, Prunier served as a senior researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France’s largest government research organization, and a professor at the University of Paris. From 2001-2006, he was seconded to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and served as the director of the Centre Français des Études Éthiopiennes in Addis Ababa. Throughout his career, Prunier has not only served as an advisor to the French government, but also consulted for the US State and Defense Departments, various European and African governments, as well as private companies. Prunier also serves on the academic council of the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa and on the editorial board of the Journal of the Middle East and Africa.

Robert Ross
Professor of Political Science, Boston College , Research Associate, Fairbanks Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University

Robert Ross is Professor of Political Science at Boston College and Associate of John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. He has taught at Columbia University and at the University of Washington and in 1989 was a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. In 1994-1995 he was Fulbright Professor at the Chinese Foreign Affairs College, in 2003 he was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Institute of International Strategic Studies, Qinghua University, Beijing, and in 2014 was Visiting Scholar, School of International Relations, Peking University. In 2009 he was Visiting Scholar, Institute for Strategy, Royal Danish Defence College. From 2009-2014 he has been Adjunct Professor, Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College. Professor Ross's research focuses on Chinese security policy and defense policy, East Asian security, and U.S.-China relations. His recent publications include Chinese Security Policy: Structure, Power, and Politics, China’s Ascent: Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics, and New Directions in the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy. His other major works include Normalization of U.S.-China Relations: An International History; Great Wall and Empty Fortress: China’s Search for Security, Negotiating Cooperation: U.S.-China Relations, 1969-1989, and The Indochina Tangle: China's Vietnam Policy, 1975-1979. Professor Ross has testified before various Senate and House committees and the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee, he advises U.S. government agencies, and he serves on the Academic Advisory Group, U.S.-China Working Group, United States Congress. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Committee for U.S.-China Relations. Professor Ross is also a member of the executive committee of the John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, Senior Advisor of the Security Studies Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Senior Advisor to the Institute for American Studies, Shanghai. He is a founding member and former board member of the United States Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific and former co-chair of the Committee's task force on Confidence Strategic Building Measures. He is on the editorial board of Security Studies, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of Cold War Studies, Issues and Studies, Asia Policy, Journal of Chinese Political Science, the Security Studies book series of Shanghai People’s Press, and the Grand Strategy book series of Peking University Press.

Natan Sachs
Director, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Natan Sachs is a fellow in and director of the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings. His work focuses on Israeli foreign policy, domestic politics, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and U.S.-Israeli relations. He is currently writing a book on Israeli grand strategy and its domestic origins. Sachs has taught on the Arab-Israeli conflict at Georgetown University's Department of Government, and research design for the Security Studies Program at Georgetown. Previously, Sachs was a Fulbright fellow in Indonesia, where his research included an empirical study of the behavioral effects of Islamic and national identities. He was subsequently a Hewlett fellow at Stanford’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Sachs earned a bachelor's degree in the Amirim Excellence program at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and a master's and doctorate in political science from Stanford University.

Richard Samuels
Director, Center for International Studies, MIT, Ford International Professor of Political Science, MIT

Richard Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been head of the MIT Political Science Department, Vice-Chair of the Committee on Japan of the National Research Council, and chair of the Japan-US Friendship Commission. He has also been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was awarded an Imperial decoration, the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star by the Emperor of Japan and the Japanese Prime Minister. His study of the political and policy consequences of the 2011 Tohoku catastrophe, 3:11: Disaster and Change in Japan, was published by Cornell University Press in 2013.  Samuels' Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia, was a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book in international affairs in 2007. Machiavelli's Children won the Marraro Prize from the Society for Italian Historical Studies and the Jervis-Schroeder Prize from the International History and Politics section of American Political Science Association. Earlier books were awarded prizes from the Association for Asian Studies, the Association of American University Press, and the Ohira Memorial Foundation. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, International Security, Political Science Quarterly, International Organization, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, The National Interest, Journal of Japanese Studies, and Daedalus. In 2014 he was appointed Einstein Visiting Fellow at the Free University of Berlin, where he directs a research group on East Asian Security during the summer.  He is currently writing a history of the Japanese intelligence community with the support of the Smith Richardson Foundation.

Adam Segal
Director, Digital & Cyberspace Policy Program, Council on Foreign Relations

Adam Segal is the Ira A. Lipman chair in emerging technologies and national security and director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). An expert on security issues, technology development, and Chinese domestic and foreign policy, Segal was the project director for the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force report Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet. His book The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age describes the increasingly contentious geopolitics of cyberspace. His work has appeared in the Financial Times, The Economist, Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Affairs, among others. He currently writes for the blog, “Net Politics.”

Emma Sky
Director, World Fellows Program, Yale University, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

Emma Sky is director of Yale University's Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Program and a Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute, where she teaches Middle East politics. She is the author of The Unraveling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq. Sky served as advisor to the Commanding General of US Forces in Iraq from 2007-2010; as advisor to the Commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006; as advisor to the US Security Co-ordinator for the Middle East Peace Process in 2005; and as Governorate Co-ordinator of Kirkuk for the Coalition Provisional Authority, 2003-2004. Prior to that, Sky worked in the Palestinian territories for a decade, managing projects to develop Palestinian institutions; and to promote co-existence between Israelis and Palestinians. In addition, Emma has provided technical assistance on poverty elimination, human rights, justice public administration reform, security sector reform, and conflict resolution in the Middle East, South Asia and Africa. Sky has published numerous articles appearing in The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico, Atlantic, Slate, Survival, Center for a New American Security, US Institute of Peace, the Guardian, and the Journal of the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. Sky is an Officer of the British Empire.

Jomo Kwame Sundaram
Tun Hussein Onn Chair in International Studies, Institute of Strategic & International Studies Malaysia

Dr. Jomo Kwame Sundaram is the Tun Hussein Onn Chair in International Studies for the period 2016-2017 at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies Malaysia. Jomo has been Assistant Director General and Coordinator for Economic and Social Development (ADG-ES), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations since August 2012. He was Assistant Secretary General for Economic Development in the United Nations’ Department of Economic and Social Affairs from January 2005 until June 2012, and Honorary Research Coordinator for the G24 Intergovernmental Group on International Monetary Affairs and Development from December 2006 until September 2012. In 2007, he was awarded the Wassily Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. He has authored and edited over a hundred books and translated 12 volumes besides writing many academic papers and articles for the media. Jomo was Professor in the Applied Economics Department, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya until November 2004, Founder Director (1978-2004) of the Institute of Social Analysis and Founder Chair (2001-2004) of IDEAs, International Development Economics Associates; he now serves on its Advisory Panel. He was also on the Board of the United Nations Research Institute on Social Development, Geneva. During 2008-2009, Jomo served as adviser to Father Miguel d’Escoto, the President of the 63rd United Nations General Assembly, and as a member of the Stiglitz Commission of Experts of the President of the United Nations General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System. During 2010-2012, he was G20 sherpa to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and also UN G20 Finance Deputy during 2011-2012. He has taught at Science University of Malaysia (USM, 1974), Harvard (1974-1975), Yale (1977), National University of Malaysia (UKM, 1977-1982), University of Malaya (1982-2004), and Cornell (1993). He has also been a Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University (1987-1988; 1991-1992) and a Senior Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore (2004).

Andrew Tabler
Martin J. Gross Fellow, Program on Arab Politics, Washington Institute

Andrew Tabler is the Martin J. Gross Fellow in the Program on Arab Politics at The Washington Institute, where he focuses on Syria and U.S. policy in the Levant. Mr. Tabler achieved unparalleled long-term access to Bashar al-Assad's Syria. During fourteen years of residence in the Middle East, Mr. Tabler served as co-founder and editor-in-chief of Syria Today, Syria's first private-sector English-language magazine; as a consultant on U.S.-Syria relations for the International Crisis Group (2008); and as a fellow of the Institute of Current World Affairs (2005-2007), writing on Syrian, Lebanese, and Middle Eastern affairs. Following his graduate work in Cairo, Egypt, Mr. Tabler held editorships with the Middle East Times and Cairo Times, where he focused on Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, before becoming senior editor and director of editorial for the Oxford Business Group (OBG). In 2001, Mr. Tabler personally oversaw with OBG the first comprehensive English-language report on Syria in more than thirty years. Mr. Tabler has lived, worked and studied extensively in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Tunisia, and Turkey. Mr. Tabler has interviewed Syrian first lady Asma al-Assad, the late Israeli president Shimon Peres, the late Palestinian president Yasser Arafat, slain Lebanese prime minister Rafiq Hariri, and former Lebanese prime ministers Fouad Siniora and Saad Hariri. His articles and opinion pieces on Middle East affairs and U.S. foreign policy have appeared in the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, the International Herald Tribune, Newsweek, Foreign Policy, and Foreign Affairs. He has also appeared in interviews with CNN, NBC, CBS, PBS, NPR, and the BBC. Mr. Tabler is author of "Syria's Collapse and How Washington Can Stop It" (Foreign Affairs, July-August 2013) and the 2011 book In the Lion's Den: An Eyewitness Account of Washington's Battle with Syria.

Caitlin Talmadge
Assistant Professor, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Caitlin Talmadge is an assistant professor of political science and international affairs at the George Washington University, where she is also a member of the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies. Her research focuses on civil-military relations, military effectiveness, defense policy, deterrence and escalation, and Persian Gulf security issues. Talmadge is a graduate of Harvard (A.B., summa cum laude) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D.), and has held fellowships from the Olin Institute at Harvard University, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Brookings Institution, and the American Political Science Association. Prior to graduate school, she worked at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. She also has previously served as a consultant to the Office of Net Assessment at the U.S. Department of Defense and was named a Next Generation National Security Leader by the Center for a New American Security in 2009. Her most recent book is ​The Dictator's Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes. She is also currently writing a book on the risk of nuclear escalation in conventional wars.

Ömer Taşpınar
Senior Fellow, Center on 21st Century Security & Intelligence, Brookings Institution

Ömer Taşpınar is a nonresident senior fellow in the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings. He is an expert on Turkey, the European Union, Muslims in Europe, political Islam, the Middle East, and Kurdish nationalism. He is a professor at the National War College and an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. He has held consulting positions at the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights in Washington, and at the strategic planning department of TOFAS-FIAT in Istanbul. The courses he has taught at the National War College and SAIS are: Islam and the west; non-military elements of statecraft; Turkey and its neighbors; and the political economy of globalization. Taşpınar is the author of two books: Political Islam and Kurdish Nationalism in Turkey and Fighting Radicalism with Human Development: Freedom, Education and Growth in the Islamic World. Some of his recent publications include: "New Parameters in U.S.-German-Turkish Relations" (AICGS, February 2005); "The Anatomy of Anti-Americanism in Turkey" (Insight Turkey, July-August 2005); "Turkey’s European Quest" (Brookings Analysis Paper, September 2004); "Europe’s Muslim Street" (Foreign Policy, March-April 2003); and "An Uneven Fit: The Turkish Model and the Arab World" (Brookings Analysis Paper, August 2003). Taşpınar is also a columnist for the Turkish daily Radikal and the Pakistan Daily Times. He has appeared on BBC World, CNN International, NBC, CNBC, CBS, and is a frequent commentator for Turkish Television.

Monica Toft
Professor of International Politics, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

Monica Duffy Toft is Professor of International Politics at The Fletcher School at Tufts University. Previously, Toft was Professor of Strategy for the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and Professor of Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. She taught at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, where she directed the Initiative on Religion in International Affairs and was the assistant director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. Prior to this, she spent four years in the United States Army as a Russian linguist. Toft’s areas of research include international security, ethnic and religious violence, civil wars and demography. Her most recent books include: Securing the Peace; Political Demography (with Jack Goldstone and Eric Kaufmann); and God’s Century (with Daniel Philpott and Timothy Shah). In addition she has published numerous scholarly articles and editorials on civil wars, territory and nationalism, demography, and religion in global politics. Her article Islamists and Nationalists: Rebel Motivation and Counterinsurgency in Russia's North Caucasus co-authored with Yuri Zhukov was published in the American Political Science Review in May 2015. Her most recent opinion pieces are on religious fundamentalism and women's equality in the Huffington Post and on the importance of identity politics for Iraq's security at Project Syndicate, a column that appeared in 19 publications in five different languages. Toft was also a supernumerary fellow at Brasenose College, University of Oxford; a Global Scholar of the Peace Research Institute Oslo; a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Minorities at Risk Advisory Board, and the Political Instability Task Force; and in 2008 the Carnegie Foundation of New York named her a Carnegie Scholar for her research on religion and violence.

Jim Walsh
Senior Research Associate, Security Studies Program, MIT

Dr. Jim Walsh is a Senior Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Security Studies Program.  Dr. Walsh's research and writings focus on international security, and in particular, topics involving nuclear weapons, the Middle East, and East Asia. Dr. Walsh has testified before the United States Senate and House of Representatives on issues of nuclear terrorism, Iran, and North Korea. He is one of a handful of Americans who has traveled to both Iran and North Korea for talks with officials about nuclear issues. His recent publications include “Stopping North Korea, Inc.: Sanctions Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences” and “Rivals, Adversaries, and Partners: Iran and Iraq in the Middle East” in Iran and Its Neighbors. He is the international security contributor to the NPR program “Here and Now,” and his comments and analysis have appeared in the New York Times, the New York Review of Books, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, and numerous other national and international media outlets.  Before coming to MIT, Dr. Walsh was Executive Director of the Managing the Atom project at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a visiting scholar at the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has taught at both Harvard University and MIT.

Edward You
Supervisory Special Agent, FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate

Edward You is a Supervisory Special Agent in the FBI’s Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, Biological Countermeasures Unit. Mr. You is responsible for creating programs and activities to coordinate and improve FBI and interagency efforts to identify, assess, and respond to biological threats or incidents. These efforts include expanding FBI outreach to the Life Sciences community to address biosecurity. Before being promoted to the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, Mr. You was a member of the FBI Los Angeles Field Office Joint Terrorism Task Force and served on the FBI Hazardous Evidence Response Team. Mr. You has also been directly involved in policy-making efforts with a focus on biosecurity. He is an active Working Group member of the National Security Council Interagency Policy Committee on Countering Biological Threats and an Ex Officio member of the NIH National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity. He also serves on two committees for the National Academies of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats and the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law’s Forum on Synthetic Biology. Prior to joining the FBI, Mr. You worked for six years in graduate research focusing on retrovirology and human gene therapy at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. He subsequently worked for three years at the biotechnology firm AMGEN Inc. in cancer research.

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Daniel Byman
Professor, Security Studies Program, Georgetown University, Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Daniel Byman is a professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a Senior Fellow and Director of Research at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He served as director of Georgetown's Security Studies Program and Center for Security Studies from 2005 until 2010. He also leads at Georgetown team in teaching a "Massive Open Online Course" (MOOC) on terrorism and counterterrorism for EdX. From 2002 to 2004 he served as a Professional Staff Member with the 9/11 Commission and with the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. Before joining the Inquiry Staff he was the Research Director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy at the RAND Corporation. Previous to this, Professor Byman worked as an analyst on the Middle East for the U.S. government. His recent publications include Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know; A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism; The Five Front War: The Better Way to Fight Global Jihad; Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism; and Keeping the Peace: Lasting Solutions to Ethnic Conflict.

Stephen Cohen
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies Program, Brookings Institution

Stephen Cohen is Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program of the Brookings Institution. He is also Adjunct Professor at the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and a member of the National Academy of Science's Committee on International Security and Arms Control. Professor Cohen's many books include India: Emerging Power; The Pakistan Army; The Indian Army; and The Idea of Pakistan. His latest publications are Four Crises and a Peace Process: American Engagement in South Asia, with P.R. Chari and Pervaiz I. Cheema, and Arming without Aiming: India’s Military Modernization, with Sunil Dasgupta. 

James Dobbins
Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center, RAND Corporation

James Dobbins is the Director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at RAND. His areas of expertise include: Iraq, Afghanistan, the Balkans, Europe, U.S. Foreign Relations, NATO, and trends and issues in international security. Dr. Dobbins is a veteran diplomat who has held senior White House and State Department positions under four presidents, and most recently served as the Bush Administration's special envoy for Afghanistan. His publications include: After the Taliban: Nation Building in Afghanistan; The Effect of Terrorist Attacks in Spain on Transatlantic Cooperation in the War on Terror; Stabilization and Reconstruction Civilian Management Act of 2004; The UN’s Role in Nation-Building: from the Congo to Iraq; The Beginner’s Guide to Nation-Building; Occupying Iraq: A History of the Coalition Provisional Authority; and After the Taliban.

Nicholas Eberstadt
Senior Adviser to the National Board of Asian Research, Member of the visiting committee, Harvard School of Public Health

Nicholas Eberstadt, a political economist and a demographer by training, is also a senior adviser to the National Board of Asian Research, a member of the visiting committee at the Harvard School of Public Health, and a member of the Global Leadership Council at the World Economic Forum. He researches and writes extensively on economic development, foreign aid, global health, demographics, and poverty. He is the author of numerous monographs and articles on North and South Korea, East Asia, and countries of the former Soviet Union. His books range from The End of North Korea to The Poverty of the Poverty Rate.

Taylor Fravel
Associate Professor of Political Science, Center for International Studies, MIT

M. Taylor Fravel is the Cecil and Ida Green Career Development Associate Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. In March 2010, he was named Research Associate with the National Asia Research Program launched by the National Bureau of Asian Research and the Woodrow Wilson International Center.

Kevin Gallagher
Associate Professor, Boston University

Kevin P. Gallagher is Associate Professor of International Relations at Boston University who specializes in economic development, trade and investment policy, international environmental policy, and Latin America. He is the author of “The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization” (with Roberto Porzecanski), “The Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley” (with Lyuba Zarsky), and “Free Trade and the Environment: Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond.” Gallagher has edited or co-edited a number of books, including “Rethinking Foreign Investment for Sustainable Development: Lessons from Latin America” (with Daniel Chudnovsky) and “Putting Development First: the Importance of Policy Space in the WTO and IFIs.” Gallagher is the coordinator of Boston University’s Global Development Policy Program. He is a faculty fellow at BU’s Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future where he leads the Global Economic Governance Initiative. Gallagher is also a research associate at the Global Development and Environment Institute of Tufts University and at the Political Economy Research Institute of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He has served as a visiting or adjunct professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University; Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; El Colegio de Mexico in Mexico; Tsinghua University in China; and the Center for the Study of State and Society in Argentina. Gallagher is co-editor of the Review of International Political Economy. In 2009, he served on the investment subcommittee of the US Department of State’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy. He currently serves on the National Advisory Committee to the North American Free Trade Agreement at the US Environmental Protection Agency and as a member of the Inter-American Dialogue’s China and Latin America Working Group. Professor Gallagher writes regular columns on global economic and development policy for The Guardian, Financial Times, and Al-Jazeera. He co-chairs the Triple Crisis blog.

Kelly Greenhill
Associate Professor of International Relations and Security Studies, Tufts University, Research Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University

Kelly Greenhill is an Associate Professor, Tufts University, and Research Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University. Her research focuses on the use of military force and what are frequently called "new security challenges," including civil wars; the use of forced migration as a weapon; intervention and (counter-) insurgency; and international crime as a challenge to domestic governance. She previously held pre- or post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University's Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, and at Columbia University's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. Greenhill is the author of Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion and Foreign Policy; which won the 2011 International Studies Association's Best Book of the Year award, and co-author and co-editor (with Peter Andreas) of Sex, Drugs and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict.

Thomas Homer-Dixon
Chair, Centre for International Governance Innovation, Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs , Professor, Centre for Environment and Business, University of Waterloo

Thomas Homer-Dixon holds the Centre for International Governance Innovation Chair of Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada, and is a Professor in the Centre for Environment and Business in the Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo. Recently, his research has focused on threats to global security in the 21st century and on how societies adapt to complex economic, ecological, and technological change. His books include The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization, which won the 2006 National Business Book Award; The Ingenuity Gap, which won the 2001 Governor General's Non-fiction Award; and Environment, Scarcity, and Violence, which won the Caldwell Prize of the American Political Science Association.

Donald Horowitz
James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science, Duke University

Donald Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School and the Central European University; as well as a Visiting Fellow at Wolfson College, at the Law Faculty of the University of Canterbury, and at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. In 2009, he was presented with the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Migration Section of the International Studies Association. His recent published books include: Ethnic Groups in Conflict; A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society; The Deadly Ethnic Riot; and Indonesia's Path to Constitutional Democracy, to be published in 2012.

Lise Howard
Associate Professor, Georgetown University

Lise Howard is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University. She has served as a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace, and was the founding director of the Master of Arts Program in Conflict Resolution at Georgetown. Dr. Howard's research and teaching interests span the fields of international relations, comparative politics, and conflict resolution. Her work focuses on civil wars, peacekeeping, U.S. foreign policy, and area studies of the Balkans and sub-Saharan Africa. She has published several articles and book chapters on these topics. Her book, UN Peacekeeping in Civil Wars, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2008, and it won the 2010 Book Award from the Academic Council on the UN System (ACUNS) for the best book on the UN system published in the previous three years. She is currently working on several projects about U.S. foreign policy in ethnic conflict, the use of force in UN peacekeeping operations, and norms of civil war termination.

Terry Karl
Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for International Studies

Terry Karl is Professor of Political Science, William and Gretchen Kimball University Fellow, and Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for International Studies. Dr. Karl was educated at Stanford University, where she received her BA, MA and Ph.D. with distinction, and where she returned to teach in 1987. Dr. Karl has published widely on comparative politics and international relations, with special emphasis on the politics of oil-exporting countries, transitions to democracy, problems of inequality, human rights and civil wars, and contemporary Latin American politics. Dr. Karl's many books include: The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States; The Limits to Competition (co-authored with members of the Group of Lisbon of the European Commission); Oil and Conflict (with Mary Kaldor); and a monograph on ending impunity, centering on the trial of Romagoza et al versus General Garcia et al, the first successful jury trial of war criminals in the US.

Joshua Landis
Director, Center for Middle East Studies, University of Oklahoma

Joshua Landis is Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Associate Professor at the University of Oklahoma’s College of international Studies. He is also the President of the Syrian Studies Association. Landis writes “Syria Comment,” a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts some 50,000 readers a month, and it is widely read by officials in Washington, Europe and Syria. Dr. Landis travels frequently to Washington DC to consult with government agencies and speak at think tanks. Most recently he has spoken at the Woodrow Wilson Institute, Brookings Institute, USIP, Middle East Institute, and Council on Foreign Relations. Most recently he has appeared on PBS News Hour, the Charlie Rose Show, al-Jazeera, Frontline, NPR and BBC radio, and he is frequently published in such journals as Foreign Policy, Middle East Policy, and Time Magazine. Dr. Landis most recent publications are Stay Out of Syria , and Why Asad Is Likely to Survive to 2013.

Chappell Lawson
Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chappell Lawson is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Lawson's major interests are Latin American politics, Mexican politics, democratization, political communication, political behavior, and U.S. foreign policy. His current research focuses on the relationship between citizens' political skills and the quality of democracy across a range of countries. Professor Lawson's recent books include Building the Fourth Estate: Democratization and Media Opening in Mexico, and Mexico's Pivotal Democratic Election, co-edited with Jorge Domi­nguez.

James Lewis
Senior Fellow and Director, Technology and Public Policy Program, CSIS

James Lewis is a senior fellow and director of the Technology and Public Policy Program at CSIS, where he focuses on technology, national security, and the international economy. Before joining CSIS, he worked in the federal government as a foreign service officer and as a member of the senior executive service. His assignments involved Asian regional security, military intervention and insurgency, conventional arms negotiations, technology transfer, sanctions, Internet policy, and military space programs. Lewis has authored numerous CSIS publications with the theme of how government policies adjust to technological innovation. They include Building an Information Technology Industry in China: National Strategy, Global Markets; Foreign Influence on Software: Risks and Recourse; Waiting for Sputnik: Basic Research and Strategic Competition; Globalization and National Security; Spectrum Management for the 21st Century; Assessing the Risk of Cyber Terrorism; and Preserving America’s Strength in Satellite Technology.

Roy Licklider
Professor of Political Science, Rutgers

Roy Licklider, Professor of Political Science, received his B.A. from Boston University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in international relations from Yale. He taught at Tougaloo College before coming to Rutgers in l968. He has taught courses in international relations, foreign and military policy, terrorism, research design, international political economy, and the comparative politics of higher education. His early research was concerned with nuclear strategy, comparative foreign policy, and the impact of economic sanctions on foreign policy, particularly the Arab oil embargo of 1973-74. His recent research has focused on how people who have been killing one another in civil wars with considerable skill and enthusiasm can sometimes—but more often than you might think—form working political communities. He is Adjunct Research Scholar at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia and has taught at Princeton and Yale. He has been a member of the Inter-University Consortium for Foreign Policy Research and the University Seminar on Reconciliation at Columbia University, President of the Comparative Foreign Policy Section of the International Studies Association, Program Officer at the Exxon Education Foundation, and consultant for the Political Instability Task Force at Science Applications International Corporation.

Marc Lynch
Associate Professor of Political Science, George Washington University and the Elliott School of International Affairs

Marc Lynch is Associate Professor of Political Science at George Washington University and the Elliott School of International Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in 1997 from Cornell University and his BA from Duke University in 1990. He works on international politics, with a specialty on the Middle East. His current research interests focus on the relationship between new media technologies and Islamist movements, public diplomacy, and Arab public opinion. He also runs the popular Middle East politics blog, Abu Aardvark. He is the author of State Interests and Public Spheres: The International Politics of Jordan's Identity, and Voices of the New Arab Public: Iraq, al-Jazeera, and Middle East Politics Today

William McCants
Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings

William McCants is a fellow at Brookings in the Center for Middle East Policy and director of its Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World. He is also adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins University and has held various government and think tank positions related to Islam, the Middle East, and terrorism. From 2009-2011, McCants served as a U.S. State Department senior adviser for countering violent extremism. He has also held positions as program manager of the Minerva Initiative for the Department of Defense; an analyst at the Institute for Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses and SAIC; and a fellow at West Point’s Combating Terrorism Center. He is the founder of Jihadica.com, an academic group blog focused on the global jihadi movement. The blog has been featured on the cover of the New York Times, and described by Wired magazine’s Danger Room as “the gold standard in militant studies.” His latest book is Founding Gods, Inventing Nations: Conquest and Culture Myths from Antiquity to Islam.

Malik Mufti
Professor of International Relations in the Middle East, Tufts University

Malik Mufti is a Professor of International Relations in the Middle East at Tufts University. He is the author of Sovereign Creations: Pan-Arabism and Political Order in Syria and Iraq; and Daring and Caution in Turkish Strategic Culture: Republic at Sea; “Jihad as Statecraft: Ibn Khaldun on the Conduct of War and Empire;” and “The Many-Colored Cloak: Evolving Conceptions of Democracy in Islamic Political Thought." His current projects include a study of Ibn Khaldun's concept of asabiyya, and a larger research project on realpolitik in Islamic political thought. He is also a recipient of the Lillian and Joseph Leibner Award for Distinguished Teaching and Advising.

Andrew Natsios
Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Andrew Natsios serves on the faculty of the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. From 2001 to 2005, he was the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Previously, Mr. Natsios served as Director of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and as Assistant Administrator for the Bureau for Food and Humanitarian Assistance (now the Bureau for Humanitarian Response), and Vice President of World Vision. He is a graduate of Georgetown University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He has written numerous articles on foreign policy and humanitarian emergencies and two books: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1997), and The Great North Korean Famine (U.S. Institute of Peace, 2001).

Roland Paris
Associate Professor, University of Ottawa

Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, founding Director of the Centre for International Policy Studies, and Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His research interests are in the fields of international security, international governance and foreign policy. Before joining the University of Ottawa in 2006, he was Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country's largest think tank; foreign policy advisor in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Privy Council Office of the Canadian government; Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder; and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. He has won two awards for public service and four awards for teaching. Paris' writings have appeared in leading academic journals including International Security and International Studies Quarterly. His book “At War's End: Building Peace After Civil Conflict” (Cambridge University Press, 2004) won the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving Global Order and the International Studies Association's prize for best book on multilateralism. He has co-edited two other volumes on peacebuilding, and is co-editor of the Security & Governance book series at Routledge. In 2012 Paris was appointed a Global Ethics Fellow by the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. He is also a fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, and a member of the board of directors of the World University Service of Canada.

Stewart Patrick
Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, Director, Program on International Institutions and Global Governance

Suzanne Maloney is a senior fellow at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution, where her research focuses on energy, economic reform and U.S. policy toward the Middle East. Most recently, she was a member of the State Department's Policy Planning Staff, covering Iran, Iraq, the Gulf States and broader Middle East issues. Prior to joining the government, she was the Middle East advisor at ExxonMobil Corporation, where she worked on regional business development, political risk analysis and corporate outreach and communications. Her most recent publication is Iran’s Long Reach: Iran as a Pivotal State in the Muslim World. She was the recipient of an International Affairs Fellowship at the Council on Foreign Relations and has previously served at Brookings as an Olin fellow and a Brookings research fellow.

Kenneth Pollack
Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Kenneth Pollack is a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He served as the director of the Center from 2009 to 2012, and its director of research from 2002 to 2009. Pollack is an expert on Middle Eastern political-military affairs, with particular emphasis on Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia and the other nations of hte Persian Gulf region. Pollack has twice served on the staff of the National Security Council as director for Near East and South Asian affairs (1995-1996) and as director for Persian Gulf Affairs (1999-2000). His most recent books are Unthinkable: Iran, the Bomb, and American Strategy; A Path Out of the Desert: A Grand Strategy for America in the Middle East; and Which Path to Persia: Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran.

Ben Ross Schneider
Professor, Political Science, MIT

Ben Ross Schneider is a Professor of Political Science at MIT, and his research interests fall within the general fields of comparative politics, political economy, and Latin American politics. His books include Politics within the State: Elite Bureaucrats and Industrial Policy in Authoritarian Brazil, Business and the State in Developing Countries, Reinventing Leviathan: The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries, and Business Politics and the State in 20th Century Latin America. He also has written on topics such as economic reform, democratization, technocracy, the developmental state, business groups, and comparative bureaucracy.

Michael Singh
Managing Director, The Washington Institute, Former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs, National Security Council

Michael Singh is managing director of The Washington Institute and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council. At the White House, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and implementing strategies on a wide range of Middle East issues, from efforts to prevent Iran's acquisition of nuclear weapons capability, to the Arab-Israeli peace process, to promoting human rights in the region. He served in the NSC for three years, as senior director for Middle East affairs and as director for Iran and for Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, and North Africa. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and was staff assistant to then ambassador Daniel Kurtzer at the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv. A member of the Harvard International Review's Board of Advisors, Mr. Singh has written extensively on Iran, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and U.S. national security strategy and management. His articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, World Affairs, the American Interest, the Economist, Foreign Affairs online, and other publications. He is a regular contributor to ForeignPolicy.com, and appears frequently in national and global media outlets such as Fox News, NBC, CBS, and the BBC.

Frederic Wehrey
Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Frederic Wehrey is a senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He focuses on security affairs, civil-military relations, and identity politics in North Africa and the Gulf. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation. Wehrey is also a twenty-year veteran of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Air Force, with tours across North Africa and the Middle East, including Iraq, where he earned the Bronze Star in 2003. He is the author of a book exploring Sunni-Shi’a relations in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait, entitled Sectarian Politics in the Gulf: From the Iraq War to the Arab Uprisings. His most recent Carnegie publications include U.S.-Arab Counterterrorism Cooperation in a Region Ripe for Extremism with Michele Dunne (2014), Ending Libya’s Civil War: Reconciling Politics, Rebuilding Security (2014), and A New U.S. Approach to Gulf Security (2014).

Name

Michèle Flournoy
Senior Adviser, The Boston Consulting Group, Co-Chair of the Board of Directors, Center for a New American Security
Chas Freeman, Jr.
Chairman, Projects International, Former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia
Francis Fukuyama
Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University
James Stavridis
Dean, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

Name

Rawi Abdelal
Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management, Harvard Business School, Director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies

Rawi Abdelal is the Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management at Harvard Business School and is the Director of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His primary expertise is international political economy, and his research focuses on the politics of globalization and the political economy of Eurasia. Professor Abdelal is a faculty associate of Harvard's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, and he serves on the executive committee of the Davis Center. Professor Abdelal's first book, National Purpose in the World Economy, won the 2002 Shulman Prize as the outstanding book on the international relations of eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Abdelal's second book, Capital Rules, explains the evolution of the social norms and legal rules of the international financial system. Abdelal has also edited or co-edited three books: The Rules of Globalization, a collection of Harvard Business School cases on international business; Measuring Identity; and Constructing the International Economy. Abdelal is currently at work on The Profits of Power, a book that explores the geopolitics of energy in Europe and Eurasia.

Scott Appleby
Marilyn Keough Dean, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame

Scott Appleby is the Marilyn Keough Dean of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs. From 2000-2014, he served as the Regan Director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Appleby co-directs, with Ebrahim Moosa and Atalia Omer, Contending Modernities, a major multi-year project to examine the interaction among Catholic, Muslim, and secular forces in the modern world. Appleby’s research examines the various ways in which religious movements and organizations shape, and are shaped by national, regional and global dynamics of governance, deadly conflict, international relations and economic development. He co-chaired the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ Task Force on Religion and the Making of U.S. Foreign Policy, which released the influential report, “Engaging Religious Communities Abroad: A New Imperative for U.S. Foreign Policy.” Appleby is the author or editor of 15 books, including the widely cited volumes of The Fundamentalism Project; The Ambivalence of the Sacred: Religion, Violence and Reconciliation; Catholics in the American Century; Peacebuilding: Catholic Theology, Ethics and Praxis; and Church and Age Unite! The Modernist Impulse in American Catholicism.

Robert Art
Director, Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University, Senior Fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT’s Center for International Studies

Robert Art, the Director of MIT's Seminar XXI Program, is Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University and a Senior Fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT's Center for International Studies. He has served as a Consultant to the Secretary of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency, and is currently a Faculty Associate of the National Intelligence Council. Professor Art's books include The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military; Reorganizing America's Defense, with Samuel P. Huntington and Vincent Davis, eds.; U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role with Seyom Brown, eds.; The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, with Patrick Cronin, eds.; Democracy and Counterterrorism, with Louise Richardson, eds.; A Grand Strategy for America; and America’s Grand Strategy and World Politics.

Deborah Avant
Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, Director of the Sié Center, University of Denver

Deborah Avant is the Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy and Director of the Sié Center at the University of Denver. Avant is also the inaugural Editor-in-Chief of the ISA’s newly launched Journal of Global Security Studies. Her research (funded by grants from the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the Carnegie Corporation, among others) focuses on civil-military relations, the roles of non-state actors in security, the politics of controlling violence, and global governance. Under her leadership the Sié Chéou-Kang Center launched the Private Security Monitor, an annotated guide to regulation, data and analyses of global private military and security services, in 2012. In 2013 she was awarded an honorary doctorate from University of St. Gallen for her research and contribution toward regulating private military and security companies. Prior to joining the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, she held positions at the University of California, Irvine and George Washington University. Her most recent books are The New Power Politics: Networks and Transnational Security Governance; Pragmatic Networks and Transnational Governance of Private Military and Security Services; and Who Governs the Globe?

Eva Bellin
Myra and Robert Kraft Professor of Arab Politics, Brandeis University

Eva Bellin is the Myra and Robert Kraft Professor of Arab Politics in the Department of Politics and the Crown Center for Middle East Studies at Brandeis University. Bellin is a comparativist whose interests center on issues of democratization and authoritarian persistence, political and economic reform, civil society, religion and politics, and the politics of cultural change. She is the author of Stalled Democracy: Capital, Labor, and the Paradox of State Sponsored Development and co-editor of Building Rule of Law in the Arab World. She has published in a variety of venues including World Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Science Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, World Development, Foreign Affairs, Middle East Policy, as well as numerous edited books. In 2006-2008 she was named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, supporting her research on high courts in the Middle East and Islamic World. She was also named a Fellow at the Princeton Institute for Regional and International Studies, Democracy and Development Program in 2006-2007. Bellin has served on the editorial board of the journal Comparative Politics since 2005. She has conducted field work in Tunisia, Egypt, Israel, and Pakistan.

Joel Brenner
Senior Research Fellow, Center for International Studies, MIT

Joel Brenner specializes in cyber and physical security, data protection and privacy, intelligence law, the administration of classified information and facilities, and the regulation of sensitive cross-border transactions. He has represented companies and individuals in a wide variety of transactions and proceedings including sensitive foreign acquisitions involving the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S., the law governing network operations, the liability of foreign governments, export controls, and internal corporate and government investigations. Brenner was Senior Counsel at the National Security Agency, advising Agency leadership on the public-private effort to create better security for the Internet. From 2006 until mid-2009, he was the head of U.S. counterintelligence under the Director of National Intelligence and was responsible for integrating the counterintelligence activities of the 17 departments and agencies with intelligence authorities, including the FBI and CIA and elements of the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Homeland Security. From 2002 – 2006, Joel was NSA’s Inspector General, responsible for that agency’s top-secret internal audits and investigations. In addition to his practice, Joel is a Senior Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he divides his time between the Center for International Studies and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab. Mr. Brenner is the author of America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime and Warfare and Glass Houses: Privacy, Secrecy, and Cyber Insecurity in a Transparent World.

Daniel Byman
Professor, Security Studies Program, Georgetown University, Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Daniel Byman is a professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a Senior Fellow and Director of Research at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He served as director of Georgetown's Security Studies Program and Center for Security Studies from 2005 until 2010. He also leads at Georgetown team in teaching a "Massive Open Online Course" (MOOC) on terrorism and counterterrorism for EdX. From 2002 to 2004 he served as a Professional Staff Member with the 9/11 Commission and with the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. Before joining the Inquiry Staff he was the Research Director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy at the RAND Corporation. Previous to this, Professor Byman worked as an analyst on the Middle East for the U.S. government. His recent publications include Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement: What Everyone Needs to Know; A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism; The Five Front War: The Better Way to Fight Global Jihad; Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism; and Keeping the Peace: Lasting Solutions to Ethnic Conflict.

Matthew Carnes
Associate Professor, Department of Government, Georgetown University

Fr. Matthew Carnes, S.J., is an associate professor at Georgetown University in the Department of Government and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and he currently serves as the Director of the Center for Latin American Studies. His research examines the dynamics of labor and social welfare policy, with particular interest in the ways societies protect their most vulnerable members: the old, the young, the ill or injured, and the unemployed. His principal regional focus is Latin America, and in recent years he has conducted extensive field research in Argentina, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia. In 2011, he was awarded the Dorothy Brown Award for Outstanding Teaching Achievement, Georgetown University’s highest teaching award, presented by the student body to the faculty member who has had the strongest impact on the students' university experience. In addition, in 2011, at the Tropaia Ceremony for Georgetown College, he was awarded the Edward B. Bunn, S.J. Award for Faculty Excellence, given by the graduating seniors in the College of Arts and Sciences. In 2012, he was featured as one of the country's best professors in the Princeton Review's publication, 300 Best Professors. And in 2013, he was chosen by students as the Faculty Member of the Year in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. In recent years, he has been a Visiting Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame (Spring 2009) and a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University (Academic Year 2011-2012). He is the author of Continuity Despite Change: The Politics of Labor Market Regulation in Latin America.

Victor Cha
Director of Asian Studies, Georgetown University, Senior Adviser, CSIS

Victor Cha joined CSIS in May 2009 as a senior adviser and the inaugural holder of the Korea Chair. He is also director of Asian studies and holds the D.S. Song-KF Chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. From 2004 to 2007, he served as director for Asian affairs at the White House on the National Security Council (NSC), where he was responsible primarily for Japan, the Korean peninsula, Australia/New Zealand, and Pacific Island nation affairs. Dr. Cha was also the deputy head of delegation for the United States at the Six-Party Talks in Beijing and received two Outstanding Service Commendations during his tenure at the NSC. He is the award-winning author of Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle, winner of the 2000 Ohira Book Prize; Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies, with Dave Kang; Beyond the Final Score: The Politics of Sport in Asia; and The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future, selected by Foreign Affairs magazine as a 2012 “Best Book on Asia and the Pacific.” His newest book is Powerplay: Origins of the American Alliance System in Asia. Dr. Cha is a former John M. Olin National Security Fellow at Harvard University, a two-time Fulbright Scholar, and a Hoover National Fellow, CISAC Fellow, and William J. Perry Fellow at Stanford University. He holds Georgetown University’s Dean’s Teaching Award for 2010 and the Distinguished Research Award for 2011.

Sarah Chayes
Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment

Sarah Chayes, a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law program, is the author of Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security. She is internationally recognized for her innovative thinking on corruption and its implications. Her work explores how severe corruption can help prompt such crises as terrorism, revolutions and their violent aftermaths, and environmental degradation. Before joining Carnegie, Chayes served as special assistant to the top U.S. military officer, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen. She focused on governance issues, participating in cabinet-level decision-making on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Arab Spring, and traveling with Mullen frequently to these regions. Chayes was tapped for the job after her work as special adviser to two commanders of the international troops in Afghanistan (ISAF), at the end of a decade on the ground there. It was a sense of historic opportunity that prompted Chayes to end her journalism career in early 2002, after covering the fall of the Taliban for NPR, and to remain in Afghanistan to help rebuild the country. She chose to settle in the former Taliban heartland, Kandahar. In 2005, Chayes founded Arghand, a start-up manufacturing cooperative, where men and women working together produce fine skin-care products. The goal was to revive the region’s historic role in exporting fruit and its derivatives, to promote sustainable development, and expand alternatives to the opium economy. From 1996 to 2001, Chayes was NPR’s Paris correspondent. For her work during the Kosovo crisis, she shared the 1999 Foreign Press Club and Sigma Delta Chi awards. Along with Thieves of State, which won the 2016 Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Chayes is the author of The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban.

Benjamin Cohen
Louis G. Lancaster Professor of International Political Economy, University of California

Benjamin J. Cohen is Louis G. Lancaster Professor of International Political Economy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has been a member of the Political Science Department since 1991. He previously taught at Princeton University from 1964-1971 and at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University from 1971-1991. His publications have addressed issues of international monetary relations, U.S. foreign economic policy, European monetary integration, developing country debt, and theories of economic imperialism. His most recent publications include The Future of Global Currency: The Euro versus the Dollar; "Toward a New Consensus: From Denial to Acceptance," in Nicola Phillips and Catherine Weaver, eds., International Political Economy: Debating the Past, Present and Future; and "Are IPE Journals Becoming Boring?" in International Studies Quarterly 54:3. He has won numerous awards and in 2000 was named Distinguished Scholar of the year by the International Political Economy Section of the International Studies Association.

Stephen Cohen
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies Program, Brookings Institution

Stephen Cohen is Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program of the Brookings Institution. He is also Adjunct Professor at the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and a member of the National Academy of Science's Committee on International Security and Arms Control. Professor Cohen's many books include India: Emerging Power; The Pakistan Army; The Indian Army; and The Idea of Pakistan. His latest publications are Four Crises and a Peace Process: American Engagement in South Asia, with P.R. Chari and Pervaiz I. Cheema, and Arming without Aiming: India’s Military Modernization, with Sunil Dasgupta. 

Alex de Waal
Executive Director, World Peace Foundation, Research Professor, Tufts University

Alex de Waal is Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation and a Research Professor at The Fletcher School at Tufts University. Considered one of the foremost experts on Sudan and the Horn of Africa, his scholarship and practice has also probed humanitarian crisis and response, human rights, HIV/AIDS and governance in Africa, and conflict and peacebuilding. Professor de Waal received a D.Phil. from Oxford for his thesis on the 1984-1985 Darfur famine in Sudan. He worked for several Africa-focused human rights organizations, focusing on the Horn of Africa, and especially on avenues to peaceful resolution of the second Sudanese Civil War. He also researched the intersection of HIV/AIDS, poverty and governance, and initiated the Commission on HIV/AIDS and Governance in Africa. De Waal was a fellow at the Global Equity Initiative at Harvard (2004-2006), and Program Director at the Social Science Research Council. He was a member of the African Union mediation team for Darfur (2005-2006) and senior adviser to the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel for Sudan (2009-2012). He was on the list of Foreign Policy’s 100 most influential public intellectuals in 2008 and Atlantic Monthly’s 27 “brave thinkers” in 2009. His most recent publications include The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa: Money, War and the Business of Power; Advocacy in Conflict: Critical Perspectives on Transnational Activism; and AIDS and Power: Why There is No Political Crisis–Yet.

James Dobbins
Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center, RAND Corporation

James Dobbins is the Director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at RAND. His areas of expertise include: Iraq, Afghanistan, the Balkans, Europe, U.S. Foreign Relations, NATO, and trends and issues in international security. Dr. Dobbins is a veteran diplomat who has held senior White House and State Department positions under four presidents, and most recently served as the Bush Administration's special envoy for Afghanistan. His publications include: After the Taliban: Nation Building in Afghanistan; The Effect of Terrorist Attacks in Spain on Transatlantic Cooperation in the War on Terror; Stabilization and Reconstruction Civilian Management Act of 2004; The UN’s Role in Nation-Building: from the Congo to Iraq; The Beginner’s Guide to Nation-Building; Occupying Iraq: A History of the Coalition Provisional Authority; and After the Taliban.

Alexander Downes
Associate Professor of Political Science, George Washington University

Alexander B. Downes is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University. Downes’s book Targeting Civilians in War won the Helen Dwight Reid Award for best dissertation in international relations, law, and politics in 2006 from the American Political Science Association. Downes has published on a variety of subjects in international security, including civilian victimization, foreign-imposed regime change, military effectiveness, democracy, coercion, and solutions to civil wars. His work can be found in the British Journal of Political Science, Civil Wars, International Organization, International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, SAIS Review, and Security Studies, as well as multiple edited volumes. Downes was recently named the winner of the inaugural Emerging Scholar Award, given by the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association to recognize scholars under the age of 45, or within fifteen years of receiving the Ph.D., who are judged to have made (through the body of their publications) the most significant contribution to the field of security studies. Downes has held fellowships at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (2007/08) and Olin Institute for Strategic Studies (2002/03), and the Center for International Security and Cooperation (2003/04) at Stanford University. His work has been funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Eisenhower Institute, Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, Smith Richardson Foundation, and Office of Naval Research. Before joining the GW faculty, Downes was Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University from 2004-2011.

Nicholas Eberstadt
Senior Adviser to the National Board of Asian Research, Member of the visiting committee, Harvard School of Public Health

Nicholas Eberstadt, a political economist and a demographer by training, is also a senior adviser to the National Board of Asian Research, a member of the visiting committee at the Harvard School of Public Health, and a member of the Global Leadership Council at the World Economic Forum. He researches and writes extensively on economic development, foreign aid, global health, demographics, and poverty. He is the author of numerous monographs and articles on North and South Korea, East Asia, and countries of the former Soviet Union. His books range from The End of North Korea to The Poverty of the Poverty Rate.

R. David Edelman
Director, MIT Project on Technology, the Economy, & National Security

R. David Edelman is Director of the Project on Technology, the Economy, & National Security (TENS), part of the MIT Internet Policy Research Initiative (IPRI). He holds joint appointments in the Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and the Center for International Studies (CIS). Until January 2017, Edelman served at the White House as Special Assistant to the President for Economic and Technology Policy at the National Economic Council (NEC) and Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP). In that role he led the White House team focusing on the digital economy — including broadband, telecommunications, spectrum, and technology trade — as well as consumer cybersecurity, domestic and international data privacy, high-tech patent and copyright issues, and antitrust/competition. From 2010 – 2012 Edelman served as the first Director for International Cyber Policy on the National Security Council (NSC). In his six years at the White House he led the development of and co-authored over a dozen legislative proposals, national strategies, Executive Orders, and Presidential reports — including the High Tech Patent Task Force; the Big Data Report to the President; EU-U.S. data privacy frameworks; and various consumer privacy bills. Previously Edelman served at the State Department’s Office of Cyber Affairs, where he developed the U.S. government's early diplomatic strategy and legal doctrine on cyber issues, and later served as the United States' lead negotiator on Internet issues at the United Nations. He was awarded the State Department's Superior Honor Award for his work on intelligence matters, and was twice the recipient of the Meritorious Honor Award for his United Nations negotiations and development of the nation's cyber diplomacy strategy.

Kimberly Elliott
Visiting Fellow, Center for Global Development

Kimberly Ann Elliott is a Visiting Fellow with the Center for Global Development and the author or co-author of numerous books and articles on trade policy and globalization, economic sanctions, and food security. In 2009-10 she chaired the CGD working group that produced the report, Open Markets for the Poorest Countries: Trade Preferences that Work, and before that, authored the book Delivering on Doha: Farm Trade and the Poor. Elliott was with the Peterson Institute for many years before joining the Center full-time. Her books published there include Can International Labor Standards Improve under Globalization?; Corruption and the Global Economy; Reciprocity and Retaliation in US Trade Policy; Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States; and Economic Sanctions Reconsidered. She served on a National Research Council committee on Monitoring International Labor Standards and on the USDA Consultative Group on the Elimination of Child Labor in US Agricultural Imports, and is currently a member of the National Advisory Committee for Labor Provisions in US Free Trade Agreements.

Michèle Flournoy
Senior Adviser, The Boston Consulting Group, Co-Chair of the Board of Directors, Center for a New American Security

Michèle Flournoy is Co-Chair of the Board of Directors of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) and a Senior Adviser at the Boston Consulting Group. She served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy from February 2009 to February 2012. She was the principal adviser to the Secretary of Defense in the formulation of national security and defense policy, oversight of military plans and operations, and in National Security Council deliberations. She led the development of DoD’s new Strategic Guidance and represented the Department in dozens of foreign engagements, in the media and before Congress.

Taylor Fravel
Associate Professor of Political Science, Center for International Studies, MIT

M. Taylor Fravel is the Cecil and Ida Green Career Development Associate Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. In March 2010, he was named Research Associate with the National Asia Research Program launched by the National Bureau of Asian Research and the Woodrow Wilson International Center.

Chas Freeman, Jr.
Chairman, Projects International, Former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia

Chas W. Freeman, Jr. is a former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia and Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. After 30 years as a U.S. diplomat, he became the chairman of Projects International in 1995. He served as the principal interpreter during President Nixon's historic visit to China in 1972. He is also currently president of the Middle East Policy Council, co-chair of the U.S. China Policy Foundation, vice-chair of the Atlantic Council, a trustee of the Institute for Defense Analyses — and a director of the Pacific Pension Institute. Mr. Freeman has been published in The New York Times and wrote two books titled "Arts of Power: Statecraft and Diplomacy" and "The Diplomat's Dictionary."

Francis Fukuyama
Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Dr. Francis Fukuyama is Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Stanford University Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), resident in FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Dr. Fukuyama has written widely on issues in development and international politics. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published byFree Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. His most recent book, Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy, was published in September 2014. Other books include America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative LegacyOur Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution; and Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creation of Prosperity. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. He previously taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University and at George Mason University's School of Public Policy. He served as a member of the President's Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He is a senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, and a non-resident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Center for Global Development.

Kevin Gallagher
Associate Professor, Boston University

Kevin P. Gallagher is Associate Professor of International Relations at Boston University who specializes in economic development, trade and investment policy, international environmental policy, and Latin America. He is the author of “The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization” (with Roberto Porzecanski), “The Enclave Economy: Foreign Investment and Sustainable Development in Mexico’s Silicon Valley” (with Lyuba Zarsky), and “Free Trade and the Environment: Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond.” Gallagher has edited or co-edited a number of books, including “Rethinking Foreign Investment for Sustainable Development: Lessons from Latin America” (with Daniel Chudnovsky) and “Putting Development First: the Importance of Policy Space in the WTO and IFIs.” Gallagher is the coordinator of Boston University’s Global Development Policy Program. He is a faculty fellow at BU’s Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future where he leads the Global Economic Governance Initiative. Gallagher is also a research associate at the Global Development and Environment Institute of Tufts University and at the Political Economy Research Institute of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He has served as a visiting or adjunct professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University; Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; El Colegio de Mexico in Mexico; Tsinghua University in China; and the Center for the Study of State and Society in Argentina. Gallagher is co-editor of the Review of International Political Economy. In 2009, he served on the investment subcommittee of the US Department of State’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy. He currently serves on the National Advisory Committee to the North American Free Trade Agreement at the US Environmental Protection Agency and as a member of the Inter-American Dialogue’s China and Latin America Working Group. Professor Gallagher writes regular columns on global economic and development policy for The Guardian, Financial Times, and Al-Jazeera. He co-chairs the Triple Crisis blog.

Sumit Ganguly
Professor of Political Science, Indiana University, Bloomington

Sumit Ganguly is a Professor of Political Science, holds the Rabindranath Tagore Chair in Indian Cultures and Civilizations and directs the Center on American and Global Security at Indiana University, Bloomington. A specialist on the international and comparative politics of South Asia he has previously taught at James Madison College of Michigan State University, at Hunter College of the City University of New York, the School of Public and International Affairs at Columbia University and the University of Texas at Austin. In the spring quarter of 2014 he was the Visiting Buffet Professor of International Studies at Northwestern University. He has also been a Fellow and a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC; and a Visiting Fellow at the Center on International Security and Cooperation as well as the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford University. In 2010 he was a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Defense Studies and Analysis in New Delhi. Professor Ganguly is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of twenty books on the contemporary domestic and international politics of South Asia. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Asian Security, Current History, The India Review, International Security, Journal of Democracy, The Nonproliferation Review and Pacific Affairs. Professor Ganguly is also an Associate Editor of Security Studies. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (New York) and a Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia. His recent publications include How Rivalries End; Deadly Impasse: India and Pakistan at the Dawn of a New Century; and Ascending India and Its State Capacity to be published in 2017.

Gregory Gause
Professor of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University

F. Gregory Gause, III is the John H. Lindsey ’44 Chair, professor of international affairs and head of the International Affairs Department at the Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on the politics of the Middle East, with a particular focus on the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian Gulf. He was previously on the faculties of the University of Vermont (1995-2014) and Columbia University (1987-1995), and was Fellow for Arab and Islamic Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York (1993-1994). During the 2009-10 academic year he was Kuwait Foundation Visiting Professor of International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. In spring 2009 he was a Fulbright Scholar at the American University in Kuwait. In spring 2010 he was a research fellow at the King Faisal Center for Islamic Studies and Research in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He has published three books, most recently The International Relations of the Persian Gulf. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Middle East Journal, Security Studies, Washington Quarterly, National Interest, and in other journals and edited volumes.

Kelly Greenhill
Associate Professor of International Relations and Security Studies, Tufts University, Research Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University

Kelly Greenhill is an Associate Professor, Tufts University, and Research Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University. Her research focuses on the use of military force and what are frequently called "new security challenges," including civil wars; the use of forced migration as a weapon; intervention and (counter-) insurgency; and international crime as a challenge to domestic governance. She previously held pre- or post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University's Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, and at Columbia University's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. Greenhill is the author of Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion and Foreign Policy; which won the 2011 International Studies Association's Best Book of the Year award, and co-author and co-editor (with Peter Andreas) of Sex, Drugs and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict.

Caroline Hartzell
Professor of Political Science, Gettysburg College

Caroline Hartzell is a Professor in the Political Science Department at Gettysburg College and was the founding director of the College's Globalization Studies program. Her specialization is in international political economy with an emphasis on issues of conflict and conflict management, development, and globalization. Professor Hartzell's research focuses on cross-national civil war settlements and the effects institutions, both domestic and international, have on social conflict. She has published numerous journal articles on the effects that power-sharing settlements of civil wars have on the duration and quality of the peace, as well as co-authored and co-edited books on those topics.  Professor Hartzell's research has been supported by the U.S. Institute of Peace, where she was a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, and a grant from the National Science Foundation to carry out survey research on factors affecting the stability of the peace following power-sharing settlements. Professor Hartzell is editor of the journal Conflict Management and Peace Science, the journal of the Peace Science Society (International).  She also serves on the editorial boards of the journals Ethnopolitics and Foreign Policy Analysis.

Ron Hassner
Associate Professor & Co-Director, Religion, Politics and Globalization Program, University of California, Berkeley

Ron E. Hassner is associate professor of international relations and co-director of University of California, Berkeley's Religion, Politics and Globalization Program. He founded and now chairs the “Religion and International Relations” section of the International Studies Association, and is an associate editor of the journal Security Studies. He studies the role of symbols and ideas in international security with particular attention to the relationship between religion and conflict. His publications have focused on territorial disputes, religion in the military, conflicts over holy places, and the pervasive role of religion on the modern battlefield. His recent publications include Religion in the Military Worldwide; Religion on the Battlefield; and War on Sacred Grounds.

 

Kathleen Hicks
Director of the International Security Program, CSIS

Kathleen Hicks is senior vice president, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and director of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS). She is a frequent writer and lecturer on U.S. foreign policy; national security strategy, forces, and budget; and strategic futures. Dr. Hicks previously served in the Department of Defense as principal deputy under secretary for policy, a Senate-confirmed position with responsibility for assisting in the development and oversight of global and regional defense policy, strategy, and operations. She also served as deputy under secretary of defense for strategy, plans, and forces, leading the development of the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review and crafting guidance for future force capabilities, overseas military posture, and contingency and theater campaign plans. Dr. Hicks was a senior fellow at CSIS from 2006 to 2009, leading a variety of national security research projects. From 1993 to 2006, she was a career civil servant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from Presidential Management Intern to the Senior Executive Service. Dr. Hicks received numerous recognitions for her service in the Department of Defense (DOD), including distinguished awards from three secretaries of defense and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She also received the 2011 DOD Senior Professional Women’s Association Excellence in Leadership Award. Dr. Hicks was a presidentially appointed commissioner for the National Commission on the Future of the Army. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Boards of Advisors for the Truman National Security Project and SoldierStrong.

Bruce Hoffman
Professor of International Relations, Georgetown University

Bruce Hoffman is currently Director of the Center for Security Studies, Director of the Security Studies Program, and a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Washington, DC. Professor Hoffman previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was also Director of RAND’s Washington, D.C. Office. From 2001 to 2004, he served as RAND’s Vice President for External Affairs and in 2004 he also was Acting Director of RAND’s Center for Middle East Public Policy. He was recently appointed by the U.S. Congress to serve as a commissioner on the Independent Commission to Review the FBI’s Post-9/11 Response to Terrorism and Radicalization. Professor Hoffman is a Global Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C.; a Senior Fellow at the Combating Terrorism Center, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY; a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel; and, a Visiting Professor at the Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. He is also a contributing editor to The National Interest and Editor-in-Chief of Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, the leading scholarly journal in the field. His recent publications include Inside Terrorism; The Evolving Global Terrorist Threat: Cases From 9/11 to Osama bin Laden’s Death; and Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947.

Thomas Homer-Dixon
Chair, Centre for International Governance Innovation, Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs , Professor, Centre for Environment and Business, University of Waterloo

Thomas Homer-Dixon holds the Centre for International Governance Innovation Chair of Global Systems at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada, and is a Professor in the Centre for Environment and Business in the Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo. Recently, his research has focused on threats to global security in the 21st century and on how societies adapt to complex economic, ecological, and technological change. His books include The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization, which won the 2006 National Business Book Award; The Ingenuity Gap, which won the 2001 Governor General's Non-fiction Award; and Environment, Scarcity, and Violence, which won the Caldwell Prize of the American Political Science Association.

Donald Horowitz
James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science, Duke University

Donald Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School and the Central European University; as well as a Visiting Fellow at Wolfson College, at the Law Faculty of the University of Canterbury, and at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. In 2009, he was presented with the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Migration Section of the International Studies Association. His recent published books include: Ethnic Groups in Conflict; A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society; The Deadly Ethnic Riot; and Indonesia's Path to Constitutional Democracy, to be published in 2012.

Lise Howard
Associate Professor, Georgetown University

Lise Howard is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University. She has served as a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace, and was the founding director of the Master of Arts Program in Conflict Resolution at Georgetown. Dr. Howard's research and teaching interests span the fields of international relations, comparative politics, and conflict resolution. Her work focuses on civil wars, peacekeeping, U.S. foreign policy, and area studies of the Balkans and sub-Saharan Africa. She has published several articles and book chapters on these topics. Her book, UN Peacekeeping in Civil Wars, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2008, and it won the 2010 Book Award from the Academic Council on the UN System (ACUNS) for the best book on the UN system published in the previous three years. She is currently working on several projects about U.S. foreign policy in ethnic conflict, the use of force in UN peacekeeping operations, and norms of civil war termination.

Jolyon Howorth
Jean Monnet Professor of European Politics, University of Bath, Visiting Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Jolyon Howorth is Jean Monnet Professor of European Politics ad personam and Emeritus Professor of European Studies at the University of Bath (UK). He has been a Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at Yale since 2002, dividing his teaching between the Political Science Department, the Jackson Institute and EP&E. Previous appointments were at: University of Paris III-Sorbonne-Nouvelle, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Aston University. He has held Visiting Professorships at Harvard University, the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris), Luiss-Guido Carli University (Rome), the University of Washington, Columbia and New York Universities, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University of New South Wales (Australia).  He has held a Senior Research Fellowship at the European Union’s Institute for Security Studies and has been a Senior Research Associate at the Institut Français des Relations Internationales (Paris), a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts (UK), Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques (France), and Member of the Advisory Boards of the European Institute for Public Administration (Netherlands), the Centre for the Study of Security and Diplomacy (UK), the Institute for Strategic Research (IRSEM, Paris) and the European Policy Centre (Brussels). He has published extensively in the field of European politics and history, especially security and defense policy and transatlantic relations - fifteen books and two hundred and fifty journal articles and book chapters. Recent books include: Security and Defence Policy in the European Union; Defending Europe: the EU, NATO and the Quest for European Autonomy; and European Integration and Defence: the Ultimate Challenge?

Josef Joffe
Fellow, Hoover Institution, Publisher/Editor, Die Zeit

Josef Joffe, the Marc and Anita Abramowitz Fellow in International Relations at the Hoover Institution, is publisher-editor of the German weekly Die Zeit. Previously he was columnist/editorial page editor of Süddeutsche Zeitung (1985–2000). His areas of interest are: U.S. foreign policy, international security policy, European-American relations, Europe and Germany, and the Middle East. His second career has been in academia. Currently, he is adjunct professor of political science at Stanford, where he was the Payne Distinguished Lecturer in 1999–2000. He also is a distinguished fellow of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. In 1990–91, he taught at Harvard, where he is also an associate of the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. He was a visiting lecturer in 2002 at Dartmouth College and in 1998 at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. He was a professorial lecturer at Johns Hopkins (School of Advanced International Studies) in 1982–1984. He has taught at the University of Munich and the Salzburg Seminar. His scholarly work has appeared in many books and in journals such as Foreign Affairs, the National InterestInternational Security, and Foreign Policy as well as in professional journals in Germany, Britain, and France. He is the author of The Limited Partnership: Europe, the United States and the Burdens of Alliance and coauthor of Eroding Empire: Western Relations With Eastern Europe. His most recent book is The Future of International Politics: The Great Powers (1998); forthcoming is Über-Power: The Imperial Temptation in American Foreign Policy, to be published by W.W. Norton.

Stephen Kaplan
Assistant Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, Georgetown University

Stephen B. Kaplan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Professor Kaplan's research and teaching interests focus on the frontiers of international and comparative political economy, where he specializes in the political economy of global finance and development, the rise of China in the Western Hemisphere, and Latin American politics. Professor Kaplan joined the GWU faculty in the fall of 2010 after completing a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University and his Ph.D at Yale University. While at Yale, Kaplan also worked as a researcher for former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. Prior to his doctoral studies, Professor Kaplan was a senior economic analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, writing extensively on developing country economics, global financial market developments, and emerging market crises from 1998 to 2003. His recent publications include Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America; Neoliberalism in Retreat? The China Boom in Latin America; and "Banking Unconditionally: The Political Economy of Chinese Finance in Latin America" published in the Review of International Political Economy in September 2016.

Terry Karl
Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for International Studies

Terry Karl is Professor of Political Science, William and Gretchen Kimball University Fellow, and Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for International Studies. Dr. Karl was educated at Stanford University, where she received her BA, MA and Ph.D. with distinction, and where she returned to teach in 1987. Dr. Karl has published widely on comparative politics and international relations, with special emphasis on the politics of oil-exporting countries, transitions to democracy, problems of inequality, human rights and civil wars, and contemporary Latin American politics. Dr. Karl's many books include: The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States; The Limits to Competition (co-authored with members of the Group of Lisbon of the European Commission); Oil and Conflict (with Mary Kaldor); and a monograph on ending impunity, centering on the trial of Romagoza et al versus General Garcia et al, the first successful jury trial of war criminals in the US.

Jonathan Kirshner
Professor of International Political Economy, Cornell University

Jonathan Kirshner is the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Professor of International Political Economy at Cornell University’s Department of Government. He served as director of Cornell’s Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies from 2007 to 2015, and previously chaired the Economics and National Security Program at the Olin Institute of Strategic Studies at Harvard. His research and teaching interests focus on international relations, political economy (especially macroeconomics and money), and politics and film. He is currently pursuing projects on classical realism, the international political implications of the financial crisis and its aftermath, and the politics of mid-century cinema. Recent books include American Power after the Financial Crisis, and Hollywood’s Last Golden Age: Politics, Society and the Seventies Film in America. His first book, Currency and Coercion: The Political Economy of International Monetary Power explored how states manipulate international monetary relations to advance security-related goals. Another book, Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War, illustrated how financial interests and international financial markets can shape and constrain states’ grand strategies and influence decisions about war and peace. Appeasing Bankers won the best book award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association.

Andrey Kortunov
Director General, Russian International Affairs Council

Dr. Andrey Kortunov is the Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council. Dr. Kortunov previously served as Deputy Director of the Institute for US and Canadian Studies. He was founder and first president of the Moscow Public Science Foundation. He has taught Russian foreign policy at the University Of Miami and at the Lewis & Clark College in Portland (University of California). In 2011, he was elected Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council non-profit partnership established by order of the President of the Russian Federation. His academic focus is international relations, foreign and domestic policy of Russia and Russian-American relations. Dr. Kortunov is the author of over 120 publications dedicated to the analysis of Soviet/Russian-American relations, global security, and the foreign and domestic policy of the USSR and Russia. His major recent publications include Russia and UN Reforms, and Disintegration of the Soviet Union and US Policies.

James Kunder
Affiliated Expert, The Lugar Center, Principal, Kunder/Reali Associates

James Kunder is principal at Kunder/Reali Associates, an Alexandria, Virginia-based consulting firm, specializing in international development, post-conflict reconstruction and civil-military relations.  Concurrently, he serves as an Affiliated Expert at The Lugar Center, in Washington, DC, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network. In 2014-15, working with Palladium, Kunder led a major evaluation project for the Department of State Bureau of Intelligence and Research, examining whether U.S. Government programs attempting to counter violent extremism abroad were achieving their objectives. Kunder has extensive government and private sector experience managing international development, relief and reconstruction programs.  At USAID, Kunder has served as Acting Deputy Administrator, Assistant Administrator for Asia and the Near East, Director for Relief and Reconstruction in Afghanistan, and Director of the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance. In the private sector, Kunder was Vice President for Program Development at Save the Children Federation. He has also served as a legislative director in the U.S. House of Representatives, and was a candidate for Congress in Pennsylvania’s Fourth Congressional District.  Prior to his service on Capitol Hill, he was on active military duty as an infantry platoon commander in the U.S. Marine Corps. He currently teaches at the U.S. Foreign Service Institute, at USAID, and at the Marine Corps University. He has authored numerous publications on international humanitarian issues, reconstruction, peacekeeping and crisis management.

Joshua Landis
Director, Center for Middle East Studies, University of Oklahoma

Joshua Landis is Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Associate Professor at the University of Oklahoma’s College of international Studies. He is also the President of the Syrian Studies Association. Landis writes “Syria Comment,” a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts some 50,000 readers a month, and it is widely read by officials in Washington, Europe and Syria. Dr. Landis travels frequently to Washington DC to consult with government agencies and speak at think tanks. Most recently he has spoken at the Woodrow Wilson Institute, Brookings Institute, USIP, Middle East Institute, and Council on Foreign Relations. Most recently he has appeared on PBS News Hour, the Charlie Rose Show, al-Jazeera, Frontline, NPR and BBC radio, and he is frequently published in such journals as Foreign Policy, Middle East Policy, and Time Magazine. Dr. Landis most recent publications are Stay Out of Syria , and Why Asad Is Likely to Survive to 2013.

Chappell Lawson
Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chappell Lawson is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Lawson's major interests are Latin American politics, Mexican politics, democratization, political communication, political behavior, and U.S. foreign policy. His current research focuses on the relationship between citizens' political skills and the quality of democracy across a range of countries. Professor Lawson's recent books include Building the Fourth Estate: Democratization and Media Opening in Mexico, and Mexico's Pivotal Democratic Election, co-edited with Jorge Domi­nguez.

Christopher Layne
Robert M. Gates Chair in Intelligence and National Security, Texas A&M University

Christopher Layne is University Distinguished Professor of International Affairs and Robert M. Gates Chair in National Security at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. His fields of interest are international relations theory, great power politics, US foreign policy, and grand strategy. Professor Layne has written two books: The Peace of Illusions: American Grand Strategy from 1940 to the Present and (with Bradley A. Thayer) American Empire: A Debate. His current book project, After the Fall: International Politics, U.S. Grand Strategy, and the End of the Pax Americana, is under contract with Yale University Press. Additionally, he has contributed extensively to the debates about international relations theory and American foreign policy in such scholarly and policy journals as International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International History Review, Security Studies, International Politics, Review of International Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, The National Interest, Foreign Policy, The Washington Quarterly, World Policy Journal, and Orbis. Professor Layne has been a frequent contributor to The Atlantic, The New Republic, The Nation, Financial Times, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, and The Australian. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is a member of the Editorial Board of Security Studies. In May/June 2014, he was a visiting fellow at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo.

James Lewis
Senior Fellow and Director, Technology and Public Policy Program, CSIS

James Lewis is a senior fellow and director of the Technology and Public Policy Program at CSIS, where he focuses on technology, national security, and the international economy. Before joining CSIS, he worked in the federal government as a foreign service officer and as a member of the senior executive service. His assignments involved Asian regional security, military intervention and insurgency, conventional arms negotiations, technology transfer, sanctions, Internet policy, and military space programs. Lewis has authored numerous CSIS publications with the theme of how government policies adjust to technological innovation. They include Building an Information Technology Industry in China: National Strategy, Global Markets; Foreign Influence on Software: Risks and Recourse; Waiting for Sputnik: Basic Research and Strategic Competition; Globalization and National Security; Spectrum Management for the 21st Century; Assessing the Risk of Cyber Terrorism; and Preserving America’s Strength in Satellite Technology.

Roy Licklider
Professor of Political Science, Rutgers

Roy Licklider, Professor of Political Science, received his B.A. from Boston University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in international relations from Yale. He taught at Tougaloo College before coming to Rutgers in l968. He has taught courses in international relations, foreign and military policy, terrorism, research design, international political economy, and the comparative politics of higher education. His early research was concerned with nuclear strategy, comparative foreign policy, and the impact of economic sanctions on foreign policy, particularly the Arab oil embargo of 1973-74. His recent research has focused on how people who have been killing one another in civil wars with considerable skill and enthusiasm can sometimes—but more often than you might think—form working political communities. He is Adjunct Research Scholar at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia and has taught at Princeton and Yale. He has been a member of the Inter-University Consortium for Foreign Policy Research and the University Seminar on Reconciliation at Columbia University, President of the Comparative Foreign Policy Section of the International Studies Association, Program Officer at the Exxon Education Foundation, and consultant for the Political Instability Task Force at Science Applications International Corporation.

Keir Lieber
Associate Professor of Political Science, Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service

Keir Lieber is Associate Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, where he is a core faculty member of the Center for Security Studies and of the Security Studies Program. He also holds a joint appointment with the Department of Government. Lieber was recently named by the Carnegie Corporation of New York as one of the country's most innovative scholars. As a member of the inaugural class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows, he received a major research grant to support his project, "Nuclear Weapons and the New Era of Strategic Instability." Lieber’s research and teaching interests include the causes of war; nuclear weapons, deterrence, and strategy; U.S. foreign policy; and international relations theory. He is author of War and the Engineers: The Primacy of Politics over Technology and editor of War, Peace, and International Political Realism. His articles have appeared in leading scholarly and foreign policy publications – most recently in International Security, Foreign Affairs, and the Atlantic Monthly. He is currently writing a book with Daryl Press (Dartmouth College) on nuclear weapons and international relations. Lieber has also been awarded fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Council on Foreign Relations, Earhart Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Mellon Foundation, and Smith Richardson Foundation.

Herb Lin
Senior Research Scholar, Stanford University

Dr. Herb Lin is senior research scholar for cyber policy and security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and Hank J. Holland Fellow in Cyber Policy and Security at the Hoover Institution, both at Stanford University.  His research interests relate broadly to policy-related dimensions of cybersecurity and cyberspace, and he is particularly interested in and knowledgeable about the use of offensive operations in cyberspace, especially as instruments of national policy.  In addition to his positions at Stanford University, he is Chief Scientist, Emeritus for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies, where he served from 1990 through 2014 as study director of major projects on public policy and information technology, and Adjunct Senior Research Scholar and Senior Fellow in Cybersecurity (not in residence) at the Saltzman Institute for War and Peace Studies in the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University; and a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. He recently served on President Obama’s Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity.  Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. His recent publications include Attribution of Malicious Cyber Incidents: From Soup to Nuts and Maneuvering The China-U.S. Relationship in Cyberspace.

Marc Lynch
Associate Professor of Political Science, George Washington University and the Elliott School of International Affairs

Marc Lynch is Associate Professor of Political Science at George Washington University and the Elliott School of International Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in 1997 from Cornell University and his BA from Duke University in 1990. He works on international politics, with a specialty on the Middle East. His current research interests focus on the relationship between new media technologies and Islamist movements, public diplomacy, and Arab public opinion. He also runs the popular Middle East politics blog, Abu Aardvark. He is the author of State Interests and Public Spheres: The International Politics of Jordan's Identity, and Voices of the New Arab Public: Iraq, al-Jazeera, and Middle East Politics Today

Suzanne Maloney
Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution, Deputy Director, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Suzanne Maloney is deputy director of the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution and a senior fellow in the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy and Energy Security and Climate Initiative, where her research focuses on Iran and Persian Gulf energy. She is the editor of Markaz, a blog on politics in and policy toward the Middle East published by the Brookings Institution. Her books include the 2008 monograph Iran's Long Reach as well as Iran's Political Economy since the Revolution. Her Brookings Essay, Iran Surprises Itself And The World, was released in September 2013, and she has also published articles in a variety of academic and policy journals. Maloney previously served as an external advisor to senior State Department officials on long-term issues related to Iran. Before joining Brookings, she served on the secretary of state's policy planning staff, as Middle East advisor for ExxonMobil Corporation, and director of the 2004 Council on Foreign Relations Task Force on U.S. policy toward Iran, chaired by former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski and Defense Secretary Robert Gates. She also serves as an adjunct professor in the Middle East Studies program at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins.

William McCants
Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings

William McCants is a fellow at Brookings in the Center for Middle East Policy and director of its Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World. He is also adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins University and has held various government and think tank positions related to Islam, the Middle East, and terrorism. From 2009-2011, McCants served as a U.S. State Department senior adviser for countering violent extremism. He has also held positions as program manager of the Minerva Initiative for the Department of Defense; an analyst at the Institute for Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses and SAIC; and a fellow at West Point’s Combating Terrorism Center. He is the founder of Jihadica.com, an academic group blog focused on the global jihadi movement. The blog has been featured on the cover of the New York Times, and described by Wired magazine’s Danger Room as “the gold standard in militant studies.” His latest book is Founding Gods, Inventing Nations: Conquest and Culture Myths from Antiquity to Islam.

John Mearsheimer
R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and the co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1982. Professor Mearsheimer has written extensively about security issues and international politics more generally. He has published five books: Conventional Deterrence (1983), which won the Edgar S. Furniss, Jr., Book Award; Liddell Hart and the Weight of History (1988); The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (2001), which won the Joseph Lepgold Book Prize; The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (with Stephen M. Walt, 2007), which made the New York Times best seller list and has been translated into nineteen different languages; and Why Leaders Lie: The Truth about Lying in International Politics (2011). He has also written many articles that have appeared in academic journals like International Security, and popular magazines like the London Review of Books. Furthermore he has written a number of op-ed pieces for the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times dealing with topics like Bosnia, nuclear proliferation, American policy towards India, the failure of Arab-Israeli peace efforts, and the folly of invading Iraq. In 2003, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Andrew Moravcsik
Professor of Politics, Princeton University, Director, European Union Program, Princeton University

Andrew Moravcsik is Professor of Politics and Director of the European Union Program at Princeton University. He has authored over 125 scholarly publications, including four books, on European integration, international relations theory, qualitative/historical methods, human rights, international law and organization, and other topics. His history of the European Union, The Choice for Europe, has been called "the most important work in the field" (American Historical Review). The National Science, Ford, Fulbright, Olin and Krupp Foundations, as well as various universities and institutes, have supported his research. In 2011, he won the Stanley Kelley Award for Undergraduate Teaching from Princeton University. He has served as trade negotiator for the US Government, special assistant to the Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea, press assistant for the European Commission, and on various policy commissions. He has published over 100 commentaries and policy analyses, currently serves as Book Review Editor (Europe) at Foreign Affairs, and was formerly Contributing Editor at Newsweek and Editor-in-Chief at a Washington foreign policy journal. Since 2004 he has been a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution, and has been at various times a long-term visitor at research institutes in France, Italy, Britain, the US and China.

Malik Mufti
Professor of International Relations in the Middle East, Tufts University

Malik Mufti is a Professor of International Relations in the Middle East at Tufts University. He is the author of Sovereign Creations: Pan-Arabism and Political Order in Syria and Iraq; and Daring and Caution in Turkish Strategic Culture: Republic at Sea; “Jihad as Statecraft: Ibn Khaldun on the Conduct of War and Empire;” and “The Many-Colored Cloak: Evolving Conceptions of Democracy in Islamic Political Thought." His current projects include a study of Ibn Khaldun's concept of asabiyya, and a larger research project on realpolitik in Islamic political thought. He is also a recipient of the Lillian and Joseph Leibner Award for Distinguished Teaching and Advising.

Vipin Narang
Associate Professor of Political Science, MIT

Vipin Narang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT and a member of MIT’s Security Studies Program. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Government, Harvard University in May 2010, where he was awarded the Edward M. Chase Prize for the best dissertation in international relations. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering with distinction from Stanford University and an M. Phil with Distinction in international relations from Balliol College, Oxford University, where he studied on a Marshall Scholarship. He has been a fellow at Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, a predoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a Stanton junior faculty fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research interests include nuclear proliferation and strategy, South Asian security, and general security studies. His first book Nuclear Strategy in the Modern Era on the deterrence strategies of regional nuclear powers won the 2015 ISA International Security Studies Section Best Book Award. He is currently working on his second book, Strategies of Nuclear Proliferation, which explores how states pursue nuclear weapons.  His work has been published in several journals including International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, and International Organization.

Andrew Natsios
Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Andrew Natsios serves on the faculty of the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. From 2001 to 2005, he was the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Previously, Mr. Natsios served as Director of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and as Assistant Administrator for the Bureau for Food and Humanitarian Assistance (now the Bureau for Humanitarian Response), and Vice President of World Vision. He is a graduate of Georgetown University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He has written numerous articles on foreign policy and humanitarian emergencies and two books: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1997), and The Great North Korean Famine (U.S. Institute of Peace, 2001).

Kenneth Oye
Director, Program on Emerging Technologies, MIT

Kenneth Oye is Professor of Political Science (School of Humanities Arts and Social Sciences) and Data Systems and Society (School of Engineering) and Director of the Program on Emerging Technologies (PoET) at MIT, with work on international relations, political economy and technology policy. His work in international relations includes Cooperation under Anarchy, Economic Discrimination and Political Exchange, and four “Eagle” monographs on American foreign policy, and advisory work for the Petersen Institute, UNIDO and US Treasury, Commerce and EXIM. His work in technology policy has focused on adaptive management of risks associated with synthetic biology, pharmaceuticals, the internet and nuclear energy, with papers in Nature, Science, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Politics and the Life Sciences and Issues in Science and Technology. Professor Oye is a faculty affiliate of the MIT Synthetic Biology Center, the Center for Biomedical Innovation, and the Internet Policy Research Initiative. He chairs biosafety committees for iGEM and the Broad Institute Biofoundry and has served as an invited expert to the UN BWC, WHO, PCAST and NRC. He is a recipient of the Levitan Award for Excellence in Teaching (2011), the Graduate Council Teaching Award (1998) and the Technology and Policy Program Faculty Appreciation Award (2003). Before coming to MIT, Professor Oye taught at Harvard University, the University of California, Princeton University and Swarthmore College.

Roland Paris
Associate Professor, University of Ottawa

Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, founding Director of the Centre for International Policy Studies, and Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His research interests are in the fields of international security, international governance and foreign policy. Before joining the University of Ottawa in 2006, he was Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country's largest think tank; foreign policy advisor in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Privy Council Office of the Canadian government; Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder; and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. He has won two awards for public service and four awards for teaching. Paris' writings have appeared in leading academic journals including International Security and International Studies Quarterly. His book “At War's End: Building Peace After Civil Conflict” (Cambridge University Press, 2004) won the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving Global Order and the International Studies Association's prize for best book on multilateralism. He has co-edited two other volumes on peacebuilding, and is co-editor of the Security & Governance book series at Routledge. In 2012 Paris was appointed a Global Ethics Fellow by the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. He is also a fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, and a member of the board of directors of the World University Service of Canada.

Stewart Patrick
Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, Director, Program on International Institutions and Global Governance

Suzanne Maloney is a senior fellow at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution, where her research focuses on energy, economic reform and U.S. policy toward the Middle East. Most recently, she was a member of the State Department's Policy Planning Staff, covering Iran, Iraq, the Gulf States and broader Middle East issues. Prior to joining the government, she was the Middle East advisor at ExxonMobil Corporation, where she worked on regional business development, political risk analysis and corporate outreach and communications. Her most recent publication is Iran’s Long Reach: Iran as a Pivotal State in the Muslim World. She was the recipient of an International Affairs Fellowship at the Council on Foreign Relations and has previously served at Brookings as an Olin fellow and a Brookings research fellow.

Kenneth Pollack
Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Kenneth Pollack is a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He served as the director of the Center from 2009 to 2012, and its director of research from 2002 to 2009. Pollack is an expert on Middle Eastern political-military affairs, with particular emphasis on Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia and the other nations of hte Persian Gulf region. Pollack has twice served on the staff of the National Security Council as director for Near East and South Asian affairs (1995-1996) and as director for Persian Gulf Affairs (1999-2000). His most recent books are Unthinkable: Iran, the Bomb, and American Strategy; A Path Out of the Desert: A Grand Strategy for America in the Middle East; and Which Path to Persia: Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran.

Daryl Press
Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth College

Daryl Press is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College. Professor Press is the author of Calculating Credibility: How Leaders Assess Military Threats, a book on decision-making during crises. He has published scholarly articles in International Security, Security Studies, and China Security, as well as articles for a wider audience in Foreign Affairs, the Atlantic Monthly, and the New York Times. Professor Press has worked as a consultant for the RAND Corporation and the U.S. Department of Defense, and is a research affiliate at the Security Studies Program at MIT. He also serves as an Associate Editor at the journal International Security. Professor Press is currently writing a book (with Keir Lieber, Georgetown University) on nuclear deterrence - during the Cold War and the future - as well as a series of articles (with Eugene Gholz, UT Austin) on energy and security.

Gerard Prunier
Independent Consultant on Eastern and Central African Affairs, Former Director of the French Center for Ethiopian Studies, Addis-Ababa

Dr. Gerard Prunier is an Independent Consultant on Eastern and Central African affairs and former Director of the French Center for Ethiopian Studies in Addis-Ababa. One of the foremost Africanists in the world today, Prunier is the author of more than two hundred scholarly articles and a dozen books in four languages, including The Rwanda Crisis: History of a Genocide, Darfur: A 21st Century Genocide—which was hailed by Foreign Affairs as “the best available account of the Darfur crisis”—and Africa’s World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of Continental Catastrophe, which was awarded a special honorable mention in the Council on Foreign Relations’ 2010 Arthur Ross Book Award competition for the best book published in international relations, the first Africa-focused book ever so honored. Until he reached the mandatory retirement age, Prunier served as a senior researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France’s largest government research organization, and a professor at the University of Paris. From 2001-2006, he was seconded to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and served as the director of the Centre Français des Études Éthiopiennes in Addis Ababa. Throughout his career, Prunier has not only served as an advisor to the French government, but also consulted for the US State and Defense Departments, various European and African governments, as well as private companies. Prunier also serves on the academic council of the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa and on the editorial board of the Journal of the Middle East and Africa.

Robert Ross
Professor of Political Science, Boston College , Research Associate, Fairbanks Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University

Robert Ross is Professor of Political Science at Boston College and Associate of John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. He has taught at Columbia University and at the University of Washington and in 1989 was a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. In 1994-1995 he was Fulbright Professor at the Chinese Foreign Affairs College, in 2003 he was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Institute of International Strategic Studies, Qinghua University, Beijing, and in 2014 was Visiting Scholar, School of International Relations, Peking University. In 2009 he was Visiting Scholar, Institute for Strategy, Royal Danish Defence College. From 2009-2014 he has been Adjunct Professor, Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College. Professor Ross's research focuses on Chinese security policy and defense policy, East Asian security, and U.S.-China relations. His recent publications include Chinese Security Policy: Structure, Power, and Politics, China’s Ascent: Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics, and New Directions in the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy. His other major works include Normalization of U.S.-China Relations: An International History; Great Wall and Empty Fortress: China’s Search for Security, Negotiating Cooperation: U.S.-China Relations, 1969-1989, and The Indochina Tangle: China's Vietnam Policy, 1975-1979. Professor Ross has testified before various Senate and House committees and the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee, he advises U.S. government agencies, and he serves on the Academic Advisory Group, U.S.-China Working Group, United States Congress. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Committee for U.S.-China Relations. Professor Ross is also a member of the executive committee of the John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, Senior Advisor of the Security Studies Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Senior Advisor to the Institute for American Studies, Shanghai. He is a founding member and former board member of the United States Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific and former co-chair of the Committee's task force on Confidence Strategic Building Measures. He is on the editorial board of Security Studies, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of Cold War Studies, Issues and Studies, Asia Policy, Journal of Chinese Political Science, the Security Studies book series of Shanghai People’s Press, and the Grand Strategy book series of Peking University Press.

Natan Sachs
Director, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Natan Sachs is a fellow in and director of the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings. His work focuses on Israeli foreign policy, domestic politics, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and U.S.-Israeli relations. He is currently writing a book on Israeli grand strategy and its domestic origins. Sachs has taught on the Arab-Israeli conflict at Georgetown University's Department of Government, and research design for the Security Studies Program at Georgetown. Previously, Sachs was a Fulbright fellow in Indonesia, where his research included an empirical study of the behavioral effects of Islamic and national identities. He was subsequently a Hewlett fellow at Stanford’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Sachs earned a bachelor's degree in the Amirim Excellence program at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and a master's and doctorate in political science from Stanford University.

Richard Samuels
Director, Center for International Studies, MIT, Ford International Professor of Political Science, MIT

Richard Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been head of the MIT Political Science Department, Vice-Chair of the Committee on Japan of the National Research Council, and chair of the Japan-US Friendship Commission. He has also been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was awarded an Imperial decoration, the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star by the Emperor of Japan and the Japanese Prime Minister. His study of the political and policy consequences of the 2011 Tohoku catastrophe, 3:11: Disaster and Change in Japan, was published by Cornell University Press in 2013.  Samuels' Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia, was a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book in international affairs in 2007. Machiavelli's Children won the Marraro Prize from the Society for Italian Historical Studies and the Jervis-Schroeder Prize from the International History and Politics section of American Political Science Association. Earlier books were awarded prizes from the Association for Asian Studies, the Association of American University Press, and the Ohira Memorial Foundation. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, International Security, Political Science Quarterly, International Organization, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, The National Interest, Journal of Japanese Studies, and Daedalus. In 2014 he was appointed Einstein Visiting Fellow at the Free University of Berlin, where he directs a research group on East Asian Security during the summer.  He is currently writing a history of the Japanese intelligence community with the support of the Smith Richardson Foundation.

Ben Ross Schneider
Professor, Political Science, MIT

Ben Ross Schneider is a Professor of Political Science at MIT, and his research interests fall within the general fields of comparative politics, political economy, and Latin American politics. His books include Politics within the State: Elite Bureaucrats and Industrial Policy in Authoritarian Brazil, Business and the State in Developing Countries, Reinventing Leviathan: The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries, and Business Politics and the State in 20th Century Latin America. He also has written on topics such as economic reform, democratization, technocracy, the developmental state, business groups, and comparative bureaucracy.

Adam Segal
Director, Digital & Cyberspace Policy Program, Council on Foreign Relations

Adam Segal is the Ira A. Lipman chair in emerging technologies and national security and director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). An expert on security issues, technology development, and Chinese domestic and foreign policy, Segal was the project director for the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force report Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet. His book The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age describes the increasingly contentious geopolitics of cyberspace. His work has appeared in the Financial Times, The Economist, Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Affairs, among others. He currently writes for the blog, “Net Politics.”

Michael Singh
Managing Director, The Washington Institute, Former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs, National Security Council

Michael Singh is managing director of The Washington Institute and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council. At the White House, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and implementing strategies on a wide range of Middle East issues, from efforts to prevent Iran's acquisition of nuclear weapons capability, to the Arab-Israeli peace process, to promoting human rights in the region. He served in the NSC for three years, as senior director for Middle East affairs and as director for Iran and for Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, and North Africa. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and was staff assistant to then ambassador Daniel Kurtzer at the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv. A member of the Harvard International Review's Board of Advisors, Mr. Singh has written extensively on Iran, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and U.S. national security strategy and management. His articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, World Affairs, the American Interest, the Economist, Foreign Affairs online, and other publications. He is a regular contributor to ForeignPolicy.com, and appears frequently in national and global media outlets such as Fox News, NBC, CBS, and the BBC.

Emma Sky
Director, World Fellows Program, Yale University, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

Emma Sky is director of Yale University's Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Program and a Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute, where she teaches Middle East politics. She is the author of The Unraveling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq. Sky served as advisor to the Commanding General of US Forces in Iraq from 2007-2010; as advisor to the Commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006; as advisor to the US Security Co-ordinator for the Middle East Peace Process in 2005; and as Governorate Co-ordinator of Kirkuk for the Coalition Provisional Authority, 2003-2004. Prior to that, Sky worked in the Palestinian territories for a decade, managing projects to develop Palestinian institutions; and to promote co-existence between Israelis and Palestinians. In addition, Emma has provided technical assistance on poverty elimination, human rights, justice public administration reform, security sector reform, and conflict resolution in the Middle East, South Asia and Africa. Sky has published numerous articles appearing in The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico, Atlantic, Slate, Survival, Center for a New American Security, US Institute of Peace, the Guardian, and the Journal of the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. Sky is an Officer of the British Empire.

James Stavridis
Dean, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

James Stavridis is the 12th leader of The Fletcher School since its founding in 1933. A retired Admiral in the U.S. Navy, he led the NATO Alliance in global operations from 2009 to 2013 as Supreme Allied Commander. He also served as Commander of U.S. Southern Command, with responsibility for all military operations in Latin America from 2006-2009. A Fletcher PhD, he won the Gullion prize as outstanding student and has published five books and over a hundred articles. His focus is on innovation, strategic communication and planning, and creating security through international, interagency, and public/private partnerships in this turbulent 21st century.

Jomo Kwame Sundaram
Tun Hussein Onn Chair in International Studies, Institute of Strategic & International Studies Malaysia

Dr. Jomo Kwame Sundaram is the Tun Hussein Onn Chair in International Studies for the period 2016-2017 at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies Malaysia. Jomo has been Assistant Director General and Coordinator for Economic and Social Development (ADG-ES), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations since August 2012. He was Assistant Secretary General for Economic Development in the United Nations’ Department of Economic and Social Affairs from January 2005 until June 2012, and Honorary Research Coordinator for the G24 Intergovernmental Group on International Monetary Affairs and Development from December 2006 until September 2012. In 2007, he was awarded the Wassily Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. He has authored and edited over a hundred books and translated 12 volumes besides writing many academic papers and articles for the media. Jomo was Professor in the Applied Economics Department, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya until November 2004, Founder Director (1978-2004) of the Institute of Social Analysis and Founder Chair (2001-2004) of IDEAs, International Development Economics Associates; he now serves on its Advisory Panel. He was also on the Board of the United Nations Research Institute on Social Development, Geneva. During 2008-2009, Jomo served as adviser to Father Miguel d’Escoto, the President of the 63rd United Nations General Assembly, and as a member of the Stiglitz Commission of Experts of the President of the United Nations General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System. During 2010-2012, he was G20 sherpa to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and also UN G20 Finance Deputy during 2011-2012. He has taught at Science University of Malaysia (USM, 1974), Harvard (1974-1975), Yale (1977), National University of Malaysia (UKM, 1977-1982), University of Malaya (1982-2004), and Cornell (1993). He has also been a Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University (1987-1988; 1991-1992) and a Senior Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore (2004).

Andrew Tabler
Martin J. Gross Fellow, Program on Arab Politics, Washington Institute

Andrew Tabler is the Martin J. Gross Fellow in the Program on Arab Politics at The Washington Institute, where he focuses on Syria and U.S. policy in the Levant. Mr. Tabler achieved unparalleled long-term access to Bashar al-Assad's Syria. During fourteen years of residence in the Middle East, Mr. Tabler served as co-founder and editor-in-chief of Syria Today, Syria's first private-sector English-language magazine; as a consultant on U.S.-Syria relations for the International Crisis Group (2008); and as a fellow of the Institute of Current World Affairs (2005-2007), writing on Syrian, Lebanese, and Middle Eastern affairs. Following his graduate work in Cairo, Egypt, Mr. Tabler held editorships with the Middle East Times and Cairo Times, where he focused on Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, before becoming senior editor and director of editorial for the Oxford Business Group (OBG). In 2001, Mr. Tabler personally oversaw with OBG the first comprehensive English-language report on Syria in more than thirty years. Mr. Tabler has lived, worked and studied extensively in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Tunisia, and Turkey. Mr. Tabler has interviewed Syrian first lady Asma al-Assad, the late Israeli president Shimon Peres, the late Palestinian president Yasser Arafat, slain Lebanese prime minister Rafiq Hariri, and former Lebanese prime ministers Fouad Siniora and Saad Hariri. His articles and opinion pieces on Middle East affairs and U.S. foreign policy have appeared in the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, the International Herald Tribune, Newsweek, Foreign Policy, and Foreign Affairs. He has also appeared in interviews with CNN, NBC, CBS, PBS, NPR, and the BBC. Mr. Tabler is author of "Syria's Collapse and How Washington Can Stop It" (Foreign Affairs, July-August 2013) and the 2011 book In the Lion's Den: An Eyewitness Account of Washington's Battle with Syria.

Caitlin Talmadge
Assistant Professor, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Caitlin Talmadge is an assistant professor of political science and international affairs at the George Washington University, where she is also a member of the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies. Her research focuses on civil-military relations, military effectiveness, defense policy, deterrence and escalation, and Persian Gulf security issues. Talmadge is a graduate of Harvard (A.B., summa cum laude) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Ph.D.), and has held fellowships from the Olin Institute at Harvard University, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Brookings Institution, and the American Political Science Association. Prior to graduate school, she worked at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. She also has previously served as a consultant to the Office of Net Assessment at the U.S. Department of Defense and was named a Next Generation National Security Leader by the Center for a New American Security in 2009. Her most recent book is ​The Dictator's Army: Battlefield Effectiveness in Authoritarian Regimes. She is also currently writing a book on the risk of nuclear escalation in conventional wars.

Ömer Taşpınar
Senior Fellow, Center on 21st Century Security & Intelligence, Brookings Institution

Ömer Taşpınar is a nonresident senior fellow in the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings. He is an expert on Turkey, the European Union, Muslims in Europe, political Islam, the Middle East, and Kurdish nationalism. He is a professor at the National War College and an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. He has held consulting positions at the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights in Washington, and at the strategic planning department of TOFAS-FIAT in Istanbul. The courses he has taught at the National War College and SAIS are: Islam and the west; non-military elements of statecraft; Turkey and its neighbors; and the political economy of globalization. Taşpınar is the author of two books: Political Islam and Kurdish Nationalism in Turkey and Fighting Radicalism with Human Development: Freedom, Education and Growth in the Islamic World. Some of his recent publications include: "New Parameters in U.S.-German-Turkish Relations" (AICGS, February 2005); "The Anatomy of Anti-Americanism in Turkey" (Insight Turkey, July-August 2005); "Turkey’s European Quest" (Brookings Analysis Paper, September 2004); "Europe’s Muslim Street" (Foreign Policy, March-April 2003); and "An Uneven Fit: The Turkish Model and the Arab World" (Brookings Analysis Paper, August 2003). Taşpınar is also a columnist for the Turkish daily Radikal and the Pakistan Daily Times. He has appeared on BBC World, CNN International, NBC, CNBC, CBS, and is a frequent commentator for Turkish Television.

Monica Toft
Professor of International Politics, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

Monica Duffy Toft is Professor of International Politics at The Fletcher School at Tufts University. Previously, Toft was Professor of Strategy for the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, and Professor of Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. She taught at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, where she directed the Initiative on Religion in International Affairs and was the assistant director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. Prior to this, she spent four years in the United States Army as a Russian linguist. Toft’s areas of research include international security, ethnic and religious violence, civil wars and demography. Her most recent books include: Securing the Peace; Political Demography (with Jack Goldstone and Eric Kaufmann); and God’s Century (with Daniel Philpott and Timothy Shah). In addition she has published numerous scholarly articles and editorials on civil wars, territory and nationalism, demography, and religion in global politics. Her article Islamists and Nationalists: Rebel Motivation and Counterinsurgency in Russia's North Caucasus co-authored with Yuri Zhukov was published in the American Political Science Review in May 2015. Her most recent opinion pieces are on religious fundamentalism and women's equality in the Huffington Post and on the importance of identity politics for Iraq's security at Project Syndicate, a column that appeared in 19 publications in five different languages. Toft was also a supernumerary fellow at Brasenose College, University of Oxford; a Global Scholar of the Peace Research Institute Oslo; a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Minorities at Risk Advisory Board, and the Political Instability Task Force; and in 2008 the Carnegie Foundation of New York named her a Carnegie Scholar for her research on religion and violence.

Jim Walsh
Senior Research Associate, Security Studies Program, MIT

Dr. Jim Walsh is a Senior Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Security Studies Program.  Dr. Walsh's research and writings focus on international security, and in particular, topics involving nuclear weapons, the Middle East, and East Asia. Dr. Walsh has testified before the United States Senate and House of Representatives on issues of nuclear terrorism, Iran, and North Korea. He is one of a handful of Americans who has traveled to both Iran and North Korea for talks with officials about nuclear issues. His recent publications include “Stopping North Korea, Inc.: Sanctions Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences” and “Rivals, Adversaries, and Partners: Iran and Iraq in the Middle East” in Iran and Its Neighbors. He is the international security contributor to the NPR program “Here and Now,” and his comments and analysis have appeared in the New York Times, the New York Review of Books, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, and numerous other national and international media outlets.  Before coming to MIT, Dr. Walsh was Executive Director of the Managing the Atom project at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a visiting scholar at the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has taught at both Harvard University and MIT.

Frederic Wehrey
Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Frederic Wehrey is a senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He focuses on security affairs, civil-military relations, and identity politics in North Africa and the Gulf. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation. Wehrey is also a twenty-year veteran of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Air Force, with tours across North Africa and the Middle East, including Iraq, where he earned the Bronze Star in 2003. He is the author of a book exploring Sunni-Shi’a relations in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait, entitled Sectarian Politics in the Gulf: From the Iraq War to the Arab Uprisings. His most recent Carnegie publications include U.S.-Arab Counterterrorism Cooperation in a Region Ripe for Extremism with Michele Dunne (2014), Ending Libya’s Civil War: Reconciling Politics, Rebuilding Security (2014), and A New U.S. Approach to Gulf Security (2014).

Edward You
Supervisory Special Agent, FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate

Edward You is a Supervisory Special Agent in the FBI’s Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, Biological Countermeasures Unit. Mr. You is responsible for creating programs and activities to coordinate and improve FBI and interagency efforts to identify, assess, and respond to biological threats or incidents. These efforts include expanding FBI outreach to the Life Sciences community to address biosecurity. Before being promoted to the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, Mr. You was a member of the FBI Los Angeles Field Office Joint Terrorism Task Force and served on the FBI Hazardous Evidence Response Team. Mr. You has also been directly involved in policy-making efforts with a focus on biosecurity. He is an active Working Group member of the National Security Council Interagency Policy Committee on Countering Biological Threats and an Ex Officio member of the NIH National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity. He also serves on two committees for the National Academies of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats and the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law’s Forum on Synthetic Biology. Prior to joining the FBI, Mr. You worked for six years in graduate research focusing on retrovirology and human gene therapy at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. He subsequently worked for three years at the biotechnology firm AMGEN Inc. in cancer research.

2018-19 ADMISSIONS WILL START FEBRUARY 2018

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2017–2018 SESSIONS

This year's sessions begin with an introduction from Dr. Kathleen Hicks and move into a range of topics that include Religion, Identity Politics and Civil Wars; Iran, Turkey, and Israel; Realism, Liberalism, and U.S.-China Relations; National Economies in a Globalized World; and more.

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