Stephen Kaplan Session Overview

Assistant Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, Georgetown University

Stephen B. Kaplan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Professor Kaplan's research and teaching interests focus on the frontiers of international and comparative political economy, where he specializes in the political economy of global finance and development, the rise of China in the Western Hemisphere, and Latin American politics. Professor Kaplan joined the GWU faculty in the fall of 2010 after completing a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University and his Ph.D at Yale University. While at Yale, Kaplan also worked as a researcher for former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. Prior to his doctoral studies, Professor Kaplan was a senior economic analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, writing extensively on developing country economics, global financial market developments, and emerging market crises from 1998 to 2003. His recent publications include Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America; Neoliberalism in Retreat? The China Boom in Latin America; and "Banking Unconditionally: The Political Economy of Chinese Finance in Latin America" published in the Review of International Political Economy in September 2016.

2018-19 ADMISSIONS WILL START FEBRUARY 2018

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2017–2018 SESSIONS

This year's sessions begin with an introduction from Dr. Kathleen Hicks and move into a range of topics that include Religion, Identity Politics and Civil Wars; Iran, Turkey, and Israel; Realism, Liberalism, and U.S.-China Relations; National Economies in a Globalized World; and more.

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2017 INTRODUCTORY SESSION & ALUMNI REUNION

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